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World War II

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Monographs, Books and Reports on CD
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29th Infantry
"29 Let's Go!"
Division



115th Infantry Regiment

History



116th Infantry
Regiment

History



175th Infantry
Regiment

History

Order of Battle

115th Infantry

116th Infantry

175th Infantry

29th Reconnaissance Troop (Mechanized)

121st Engineer Combat Battalion

104th Medical Battalion

29th Division Artillery

110th Field Artillery Battalion (105mm Howitzer)

111th Field Artillery Battalion (105mm Howitzer)

224th Field Artillery Battalion (105mm Howitzer)

227th Field Artillery Battalion (155mm Howitzer)

Special Troops

729th Ordnance Light Maintenance Company

29th Quartermaster Company

29th Signal Company

Military Police Platoon

Headquarters Company

Band


Commanders
Maj. Gen. Leonard T. Gerow
11 Oct 42
Maj. Gen. Charles H. Gerhardt 22 Jul 43


Campaigns
Normandy
6 Jun - 24 Jul 44
North France
25 Jul - 14 Sep 44
Rhineland
15 Sep 44 - 21 Mar 45
Central Europe
22 Mar - 11 May 45


Medals
Medal of Honor
2
Distinguished Service Cross
40
Silver Star
856
Legion of Merit
11
Soldiers Medal
25
Bronze Star Medal
5,954
Air Medal
176

Days in Combat

242


Casualties
Killed
3,720
Wounded 15,403
Missing 462
Captured 526
Battle Casualties 20,111
Non-Battle Casualties
8,665
Total Casualties 28,776


Medal of Honor Citations

Sherwood H. Hallman
S/Sgt, 175th Infantry
29th Infantry Division
Brest, Brittany, France
September 13, 1944


Frank D. Peregory
T/Sgt, 116th Infantry
Company K
29th Infantry Division
Grandcampe, France
June 8, 1944





1941
 
3 Feb-
The division was reactivated into active service. Elements of the division were then sent to Fort Meade, Maryland for training.
1942  
12 Mar-
Reorganization was complete, and the division then began preparing for deployment to Europe.
5 Oct-
The division was sent to England. It was based throughout England and Scotland, where it immediately began training for an invasion of northern Europe across the English Channel.
1943

May-
The division moved to the Devon–Cornwall peninsula and started conducting simulated attacks against fortified positions. At this time it was assigned to V Corps of the First United States Army. 
1944

6 Jun-
Operation Overlord. The invasion of Normandy. The cross-channel invasion of France begins.
7 Jun-

A second wave of 20,000 reinforcements from the 1st and 29th divisions was sent ashore. The entire division had landed in Normandy.

9 Jun-
Omaha Beach was secure and the division occupied Isigny.
14 Jun

The division was reassigned to XIX Corps, First United States Army, Twelfth United States Army Group.

18 Jul-

The 29th Division, which was already heavily underpower after heavy casualties on D-Day, was even further depleted in the intense fighting for Saint-Lô.

7 Aug-
The Division joined in the battle for Vire, capturing that strongly held city.
25 Aug-
It was then reassigned to V Corps, and then again to VIII Corps. Turning west, the 29th took part in the assault on Brest which lasted until September 18.
Oct-
After a short rest, the division returned to XIX Corps and moved to defensive positions along the Teveren-Geilenkirchen line in Germany and maintained those positions through October.
16 Nov-
The division began its drive to the Roer River, blasting its way through Siersdorf, Setterich, Durboslar, and Bettendorf, and reaching the Roer by the end of the month.
8 Dec-
Heavy fighting reduced Jülich Sportplatz and the Hasenfeld Gut.
8 Dec-
The division was assigned to XIII Corps and held defensive positions along the Roer and prepared for the next major offensive.
1945
 
23 Feb-
The division was reassigned to XIX Corps, and the attack jumped off across the Roer.
1 Mar-
The division continued through Jülich, Broich, Immerath, and Titz, to Mönchengladbach. The division was out of combat in March.
Apr-
In early April the division was reassigned to XVI Corps, where 116th Infantry helped mop up in the Ruhr area.
4 May-
The division pushed to the Elbe River and held defensive positions.
Dec-
The division remained on occupation duty until the end of 1945.
1946
 
Jan-

It returned to the United States in January 1946 and was demobilized and deactivated on January 17, 1946 at Camp Kilmer, New Jersey.




28th Infantry Division
in World War II

CD 1
Open all files from the folders on the CDs
Install Adobe Acrobat PDF Reader from CD 1

The files below are found on CD 1


1944

29th Infantry Division

After Action
Reports





CD 1
59 Pages - PDF


6 - 13 Jun 44

29th Infantry Division
116th Infantry
Regiment
Company M

Operations
Omaha Beach
Landing

CD 1
41 Pages - PDF


6 - 10 Jun 44

29th Infantry Division
116th Infantry
Regiment
3rd Battalion

Operations
Omaha Beach


CD 1
46 Pages - PDF


6 Jun 44

29th Infantry Division

DDay






CD 1
5 Pages - PDF


6 Jun 44

29th Infantry Division

DDay
Interviews







CD 1
62 Pages - PDF


Medal of Honor

Frank D. Peregory
116th Infantry
Grandcampe, France

June 8, 1944

Sherwood H. Hallman
175th Infantry Regiment
Brest, Brittany, France
September 13, 1944

CD 1
2 Page - PDF


13 Jul 44

29th Infantry Division

Capture
St.Lo, France







CD 1
31 Pages - PDF


18 Jul 44

War Room
Journal









CD 1
32 Pages - PDF


1945

29th Infantry Division

After Action Reports

CD 1
27 Pages - PDF


29th Infantry Division

Awards
List


CD 1
2 Pages - PDF


29th Infantry Division

Casualties Roster



CD 1
2 Pages - PDF


29th Infantry Division

Deaths



CD 1
193 Pages - PDF


29th Infantry Division

Guest Log




CD 1
5 Pages - PDF


29th Infantry Division

"29 Lets Go!"

Division Newsletter


CD 1
133 Pages - PDF


29th Infantry Division

175th Infantry
Regiment

Plaque

CD 1
1 Page - PDF


World War II
Situation Maps
Europe




CD 1
83 Pages - PDF



6 Jun - 24 Jul 44

Normandy
Campaign

CD 1
51 Pages - PDF



1 Jul - 11 Sep 44

Breakout
and Pursuit

CD 1
771 Pages - PDF



15 Sep 44 - 21 Mar 45

Rhineland
Campaign

CD 1
36 Pages - PDF



22 Mar - 11 May 45

Central Europe
Campaign

CD 1
36 Pages - PDF



29th Infantry Division

Big Picture
Series





CD 1
28m06s - MP4


16 Jul 44

29th Infantry Division

Saint Lo - Manche





CD 1
07m52s - MP4


17 Jul 44

29th Infantry Division

Normandy





CD 1
04m30s - MP4


3 Dec 45

29th Infantry Division

Distinguished Unit Citation

Geisenkirche,
Germany

CD 1
03m23s - MP4
The files below are found on CD 2


4 Jun 44

Utah Beach
To Cherbourg

CD 2
251 Pages - PDF


4 Jun 44

Omaha
Beachhead

CD 2
176 Pages - PDF


7 - 19 Jul 44

St. Lo


CD 2
251 Pages - PDF


25 Jul - 14 Sep 44

Northern France
Campaign

CD 2
32 Pages - PDF


Aug 44 - Mar 45





Riviera
To The Rhine




CD 2
630 Pages - PDF


11 Sep - 16 Dec 44





Siegfried Line





CD 2
697 Pages - PDF


3 Jan - May 45





Last Offensive





CD 2
555 Pages - PDF


World War 1

29th Infantry Division

2 Books

Quips and Memoirs
of the Corps

Machine Gunners
Blue Gray Division

CD 2
444 Pages - PDF


Chart

Organization
USArmy Regiment

CD 2
1 Page - PDF


Long Road
To Victory



CD 2
20 Pages - PDF


US Air Force
Combat Chronology
1941-45


CD 2
743 Pages - PDF


"Fighting Divisions"

Army
Divisions History

CD 2
241 Pages - PDF


Supreme Command

European
Theater Operations



CD 2
631 Pages - PDF


Brief History
of World War II





CD 2
55 Pages - PDF


APOs

Army Postal Service
Addresses

Alphabetical Listings

CD 2
149 Pages - PDF


Form SF180
Records Request

Request for
Personnel Records


CD 2
3 Pages - PDF


Research Guide

National Archives
Finding Information of
Personal Participation
in World War II Guide

CD 2
5 Pages - PDF


Mines - Booby Traps
Identification Guide





CD 2
42 Pages - PDF


Aircraft
Nose Art





CD 2
34 Pages - PDF



Aircraft
Recognition Guide





CD 2
17 Pages - PDF



Aircraft
Insignia Poster


CD 2
1 Page - PDF



US
World War II
Posters

CD 2
250 Pages - PDF



German
World War II
Posters

CD 2
75 Pages - PDF


Rank
Insignia of Grade


CD 2
1 Page - PDF


Shoulder Patch
Identification
Guide



CD 2
19 Pages - PDF


Chart

Enlisted Men's
Uniform Insignias


CD 2
1 Page - PDF


Song Lyrics

Army
HIT KIT
of Popular Songs

CD 2
6 Pages - PDF


Comic Book
Covers




CD 2
8 Pages - PDF
The files below are found on CD 3


Music

"Singing Soldiers"

Winners Second
All Army Soldier
Singing Contest

1954-55
19 Song LP Record
2 Album Set

CD 3
Info - PDF
Files - Folder


Music

What Do You
Do In The Infantry ?

American Military March
Semper Fidelis (Marines)




CD 3
Files - Folder


Radio

DDay
Radio Broadcasts
~
13 - BBC/CBS/NBC
Normandy Invasion
Broadcasts
~
24 - CBS Invasion
1 Hour Broadcasts


CD 3
Files - Folder



Cartoons

11
BANNED
World War II
Cartoons

Popeye
Superman
Donald Duck
Bugs Bunny
more ...

CD 3
Info - PDF



29th Infantry
"29 Let's Go!"

Division

29th Infantry Division History

The division was reactivated into active service in February 3, 1941. Elements of the division were then sent to Fort Meade, Maryland for training.

The 57th and 58th Brigades were deactivated as part of an army-wide removal of Brigades from divisions. Instead, the division was based around three infantry regiments; the 115th Infantry Regiment, the 116th Infantry Regiment, and the 175th Infantry Regiment.

Also assigned to the division were the 110th, 111th, 224th, and 227th Field Artillery Battalions, as well as the 29th Signal Company, the 729th Ordnance Company, the 29th Quartermaster Company, the 29th Reconnaissance Troop, the 121st Engineer Battalion, the 104th Medical Battalion, and the 29th Counter Intelligence Detachment.

On March 12, 1942, this reorganization was complete, and the division then began preparing for deployment to Europe.

The division was sent to England on October 5, 1942. It was based throughout England and Scotland, where it immediately began training for an invasion of northern Europe across the English Channel.

In May 1943 the division moved to the Devon–Cornwall peninsula and started conducting simulated attacks against fortified positions. At this time it was assigned to V Corps of the First United States Army.

The cross-channel invasion of France finally came on June 6, 1944, Operation Overlord, the invasion of Normandy. The 29th Infantry Division sent the 116th Infantry Regiment to support the western flank of the 1st Infantry Division's 16th Infantry Regiment at Omaha Beach. Omaha was known to be the most difficult of the five landing beaches, due to its rough terrain and bluffs overlooking the beach, which had been well fortified by its German defenders of the 352nd Infantry Division.

The 116th Infantry Regiment was assigned four sectors of the beach; Easy Green, Dog Red, Dog White, and Dog Green. Soldiers of the 29th Infantry Division boarded a large number of attack transports for the D-Day invasion, among them Landing craft, Landing Ship, Tank and Landing Ship, Infantry ships and other vessels such as the SS Empire Javelin, USS Charles Carroll, and USS Buncombe County.

As the ships were traveling to the beach, the heavy seas, combined with the chaos of the fighting caused most of the landing force to be thrown off-course and most of the 116th Infantry missed its landing spots. Most of the regiment's tanks, launched from too far off-shore, floundered and sank in the channel.

The soldiers of the 116th Infantry began to hit the beach at 0630, coming under heavy fire from German fortifications. A Company, 1st Battalion, 116th Infantry was annihilated by overwhelming fire as it landed on the 116th's westernmost section of the beach, along with half of C Company, 2nd Ranger Battalion which was landing to the west of the 116th.

The 1st Infantry Division's forces ran into similar fortifications on the eastern half of the beach, suffering massive casualties coming ashore.

By 0830, the landings were called off for lack of space on the beach, as the Americans on Omaha Beach were unable to overcome German fortifications guarding the beach exits.

General Omar Bradley, commander of the First Army, considered evacuating survivors and landing the rest of the divisions elsewhere. However, by noon, elements of the American forces had been able to organize and advance off the beach, and the landings resumed.

By nightfall, the division headquarters landed on the beach with about 60 percent of the division's total strength, and began organizing the push inland. On June 7, a second wave of 20,000 reinforcements from the 1st and 29th divisions was sent ashore.

By the end of D-Day, 2,400 men from the two divisions had become casualties on Omaha Beach. Added to casualties at other beaches and air-drops made the total casualties for Operation Overlord 6,500 Americans and 3,000 British and Canadians, lighter numbers than expected.

The entire division had landed in Normandy by June 7. By June 9, Omaha Beach was secure and the division occupied Isigny. On July 14, the division was reassigned to XIX Corps, First United States Army, Twelfth United States Army Group.

The division cut across the Elle River and advanced slowly toward Saint-Lô, fighting bitterly in the Normandy hedge rows. German reserves formed a new defensive front outside the town, and American forces fought a fierce battle with them two miles outside of the town.

German forces used the dense bocage foliage to their advantage, mounting fierce resistance in house to house fighting in the ravaged Saint-Lô. By the end of the fight, the Germans were relying on Artillery support to hold the town following the depletion of the infantry contingent.

The 29th Division, which was already heavily underpower after heavy casualties on D-Day, was even further depleted in the intense fighting for Saint-Lô. Eventually, the 29th was able to capture the city in a direct assault, supported by airstrikes from P-47 Thunderbolts.

After taking Saint-Lô, on July 18, the Division joined in the battle for Vire, capturing that strongly held city by August 7. it continued to face stiff German resistance as it advanced to key positions southeast of Saint-Lô.

It was then reassigned to V Corps, and then again to VIII Corps. Turning west, the 29th took part in the assault on Brest which lasted from August 25 until September 18.

After a short rest, the division returned to XIX Corps and moved to defensive positions along the Teveren-Geilenkirchen line in Germany and maintained those positions through October. On November 16, the division began its drive to the Roer River, blasting its way through Siersdorf, Setterich, Durboslar, and Bettendorf, and reaching the Roer by the end of the month. Heavy fighting reduced Jülich Sportplatz and the Hasenfeld Gut on December 8.

From December 8, 1944 to February 23, 1945, the division was assigned to XIII Corps and held defensive positions along the Roer and prepared for the next major offensive. The division was reassigned to XIX Corps, and the attack jumped off across the Roer on February 23, and carried the division through Jülich, Broich, Immerath, and Titz, to Mönchengladbach by March 1, 1945.

The division was out of combat in March. In early April the division was reassigned to XVI Corps, where 116th Infantry helped mop up in the Ruhr area. On April 19, 1945 the division, assigned to XIII Corps, pushed to the Elbe River and held defensive positions until May 4.

Meanwhile, the 175th Infantry cleared the Klotze Forest. After V-E Day, the division was on military government duty in the Bremen enclave. It was assigned to XVI Corps again for this assignment.

The division remained on occupation duty until the end of 1945. It returned to the United States in January 1946 and was demobilized and deactivated on January 17, 1946 at Camp Kilmer, New Jersey.

During World War II, the 29th Infantry Division suffered 3,720 killed in action, 15,403 wounded in action, 462 missing in action, 526 prisoners of war, and 8,665 non-combat casualties, for a total of 28,776 casualties during 242 days of combat. This amounted to over 200 percent of the division's normal strength.

The division, in turn, took 38,912 German prisoners of war. Soldiers of the 29th Infantry Division were awarded two Medals of Honor, 44 Distinguished Service Crosses, one Distinguished Service Medal, 854 Silver Star Medals, 17 Legion of Merit Medals, 24 Soldiers' Medals, 6,308 Bronze Star Medals, and 176 Air Medals during the conflict. The division itself was awarded four distinguished unit citations and four campaign streamers for the conflict.



115th Infantry
Regiment
115th Infantry Regiment History

On 3 February 1941, the First Maryland Infantry Regiment, Maryland Army National Guard, was inducted into federal service as the 115th Infantry Regiment at Frederick, Maryland as part of the second partial mobilization of the National Guard for World War II, and then moved to Fort George G. Meade on 18 February 1941 to join the 29th Infantry Division.

The regiment completed in-processing, traded in its equipment for modern equipment, and started to repeat its division level training. It was then transferred to the A.P. Hill Military Reservation on 22 April 1942 to participate in maneuvers, and then moved to the Carolina Maneuvers to participate in large unit maneuvers on 8 July 1942.

It then moved on to Camp Blanding to fill its empty personnel slots on 19 August 1942, and then staged at Camp Kilmer on 20 September 1942, and shipped out from the New York Port of Embarkation on 5 October 1942 on the RMS Queen Mary and RMS Queen Elizabeth.

They arrived in England on 11 October 1942, and then were attached to the 1st Infantry Division in preparation for the D-Day invasion. They moved with the 1st Infantry Division from 2 June 1944, and remained with 1st Infantry Division until 7 June 1944, when they returned to the 29th Infantry Division for further operations.

Their participation in the Normandy Campaign continued until it was over on 24 July 1944. They immediately moved into the Northern France Campaign on 25 July 1944, which continued until it was over on 14 September 1944.

During this period the 115th Infantry Regiment was engaged in one of the war's forgotten chapters, "The Battle of Brest". The Battle for Brest was one of the fiercest battles fought during Operation Cobra, the Allied breakout of Normandy which began on 27 July 1944, during the Battle of Normandy during World War II.

Part of the Allied plan for the invasion of mainland Europe called for the capture of port facilities, in order to ensure the timely delivery of the enormous amount of war material required to supply the invading Allied forces (it was estimated that the 37 Allied divisions to be on the continent by September 1944 would need 26,000 tons of supplies each day). The main port the Allied forces hoped to seize and put into their service was Brest, in northwestern France.
Concrete Submarine Pens at Brest

Brest also served as a major German U-Boat base from 18 June 1940 until its surrender to U.S forces during the Brittany Campaign.

The 115th Infantry then started participation in the Rhineland Campaign on 15 September 1944, whereupon the 115th Infantry crossed from France to Belgium and Holland both on 27 September 1944, and entered Germany on 30 September 1944.

This campaign continued unabated until 21 March 1945, and the 115th Infantry did not take part in the Ardennes Campaign. With the end of the Rhineland Campaign, the 115th Infantry moved to the Central Europe Campaign on 22 March 1945, which continued until the end of Hostilities, which took place on 8 May 1945, but the campaign was not declared terminated until 11 May 1945.

The 115th Infantry was on occupation duty at Bremen, Germany on VE Day, and this continued through 1946. The regiment returned to the New York Port of Embarkation on 16 January 1946, and mustered out at Camp Kilmer the next day.

The 115th Regiment sustained 5,948 casualties during the fighting in Europe. Campaign streamers for Normandy (with arrowhead), North France, Rhineland, and Central Europe were added to the colors. Additional decorations included a distinguished unit streamer embroidered "St. Laurent-Sur-Mer," a streamer in the colors of the French Croix du Guerre with palms embroidered "St. Laurent-Sur-Mer," and, for the First Battalion, a streamer in the colors of the French Croix du Guerre with Silver Star embroidered "St. Lo."



116th Infantry
Regiment
116th Infantry Regiment History

The 116th Infantry Regiment played a major role in the Eastern Theater of Operations between 1941-1945. Soldiers from the regiment along with other elements of the 29th Infantry Division, and the 1st Infantry Division were the first troops ashore during the Invasion of Europe known as Operation Overlord.

Units within the 116th suffered heavy casualties during the landings. With 1st Battalion's Alpha Company having 96% casualties in the first wave on Omaha Beach.

Though the fighting was heavy, the 116th pushed the way through and enabled the invasion force to establish a foot hold in France. Later the 116th paved the way and participated in the Assault of Saint Lo.



175th Infantry
Regiment
175th Infantry Regiment History

In 1939 the Fifth Regiment, in anticipation of its induction into the active Army, began to prepare, using its annual training to prepare for combat.

On 31 December 1940, the Army re-designated the Fifth Regiment as the 175th Infantry Regiment to avoid confusion with the Regular Army’s 5th Infantry Regiment and designated as one of three infantry regiments of the 29th Infantry Division. In January 1941, the regiment was federalized.

The 175th moved to Ft. Meade, Maryland, where it was reinforced by an influx of draftees in April and participated in 29th Division maneuvers in North Carolina that fall. The regiment trained in the United States until 5 October 1942 when it sailed to England on the HMS Queen Elizabeth.

The 175th was quartered at the Tidworth Barracks where it underwent intense training until its move to Cornwall. The regiment trained on the cold moors during the late summer of 1943 and then transitioned to invasion training. It performed amphibious assault training at Slapton Sands. It was then moved to the invasion assembly area in Devon. On 4 June 1944, the regiment boarded the LSTs which would carry them to the beaches of Normandy.

Following a 24 hour delay, the 115th and 116th Infantry assaulted the beaches on 6 June. The 175th, the 29th Division's reserve, landed on the still unsecured Omaha Beach on the morning of 7 June, and proceeded to its objective to seize the village of Isigny. It pushed through Isigny and crossed the Vire River and on to St Lo.

The 175th fought stiff German resistance hedge row by hedge row. The 1st Battalion, 175th Infantry pushed the American lines to within three miles of St Lo, creating a salient into the German lines. The unit defended the high ground, known as Hill 108 but nicknamed “Purple Heart Hill” as they were surrounded on three sides.

The regiment was rotated into the division reserve for the final thrust into St Lo. The 175th fought in Normandy until the end of August when the division was moved to Brittany to participate in the capture of Brest and the German submarine pens located there.

Following the Battle of Brest, the division was moved to Holland to participate in the 9th Army’s drive to the Rhine River. The regiment played a significant role in capturing Julich followed by the occupation of the industrial center of Munchen-Gladbach.

The regiment was moved to occupy the lines along the Elbe River near Felberg. On 2 May 1945, a patrol from 3-175 Infantry made contact with elements of the 28th Company, 6th Guards Cavalry of the Russian army. Following the surrender of the German army, the regiment remained in Europe until 1 January 1946.

The 175th demobilized between 11 - 17 January 1946, this time keeping the federal numerical designation. It reorganized as an infantry regiment and regained federal recognition on 12 November 1946.



29th Infantry
Division
Campaigns of World War II

Normandy
6 Jun - 24 Jul 44
North France
25 Jul - 14 Sep 44
Rhineland
15 Sep 44 - 21 Mar 45
Central Europe
22 Mar - 11 May 45
.

Normandy
6 Jun - 24 Jul 44

A great invasion force stood off the Normandy coast of France as dawn broke on 6 June 1944: 9 battleships, 23 cruisers, 104 destroyers, and 71 large landing craft of various descriptions as well as troop transports, mine sweepers, and merchantmen—in all, nearly 5,000 ships of every type, the largest armada ever assembled.

The naval bombardment that began at 0550 that morning detonated large minefields along the shoreline and destroyed a number of the enemy’s defensive positions. To one correspondent, reporting from the deck of the cruiser HMS Hillary, it sounded like “the rhythmic beating of a gigantic drum” all along the coast.

In the hours following the bombardment, more than 100,000 fighting men swept ashore to begin one of the epic assaults of history, a “mighty endeavor,” as President Franklin D. Roosevelt described it to the American people, “to preserve. . . our civilization and to set free a suffering humanity.”


North France
25 Jul - 14 Sep 44

As July 1944 entered its final week, Allied forces in Normandy faced, at least on the surface, a most discouraging situation. In the east, near Caen, the British and Canadians were making little progress against fierce German resistance.

In the west, American troops were bogged down in the Norman hedgerows. These massive, square walls of earth, five feet high and topped by hedges, had been used by local farmers over the centuries to divide their fields and protect their crops and cattle from strong ocean winds.

The Germans had turned these embankments into fortresses, canalizing the American advance into narrow channels, which were easily covered by antitank weapons and machine guns.

The stubborn defenders were also aided by some of the worst weather seen in Normandy since the turn of the century, as incessant downpours turned country lanes into rivers of mud.

By 25 July, the size of the Allied beachhead had not even come close to the dimensions that pre–D-day planners had anticipated, and the slow progress revived fears in the Allied camp of a return to the static warfare of World War I.

Few would have believed that, in the space of a month and a half, Allied armies would stand triumphant at the German border.


Rhineland
15 Sep 44 - 21 Mar 45

The Rhineland Campaign, although costly for the Allies, had clearly been ruinous for the Germans. The Germans suffered some 300,000 casualties and lost vast amounts of irreplaceable equipment.

Hitler, having demanded the defense of all of the German homeland, enabled the Allies to destroy the Wehrmacht in the West between the Siegfried Line and the Rhine River. Now, the Third Reich lay virtually prostrate before Eisenhower’s massed armies.


Central Europe Campaign
22 March - 11 May 1945

By the beginning of the Central Europe Campaign of World War II, Allied victory in Europe was inevitable. Having gambled his future ability to defend Germany on the Ardennes offensive and lost, Hitler had no real strength left to stop the powerful Allied armies. Yet Hitler forced the Allies to fight, often bitterly, for final victory.

Even when the hopelessness of the German situation became obvious to his most loyal subordinates, Hitler refused to admit defeat. Only when Soviet artillery was falling around his Berlin headquarters bunker did the German Fuehrer begin to perceive the final outcome of his megalomaniacal crusade.



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