Researching
World War II

Unit Histories, Documents
Monographs, Books and Reports on CD
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2nd Infantry
Division

"Second to None"
"Indian Head"
"Warrior Division"



9th Infantry
"The Manchus"
" Keep Up The
Fire!"
Regiment

History



23rd Infantry
" Tomahawks"
"We Serve"
Regiment

History



38th Infantry
" Rock of the
Marne"
Regiment

History

Order of Battle
9th Infantry Regiment
23rd Infantry Regiment
38th Infantry Regiment

2nd Reconnaissance Troop (Mechanized)
2nd Engineer Combat Battalion
2nd Medical Battalion
15th Field Artillery Battalion (105mm Howitzer)
37th Field Artillery Battalion (105mm Howitzer)
38th Field Artillery Battalion (105mm Howitzer)
12th Field Artillery Battalion (155mm Howitzer)
702nd Ordnance Light Maintenance Company
2nd Quartermaster Company
2nd Signal Company
Military Police Platoon
Headquarters Company Band


Casualties

Killed in Action : 3031
Wounded in Action : 12758
Died of Wounds : 457

Days of Combat : 303


Commanders
MG John C. H. Lee
Nov 6, 1941 – May 8, 1942

MG Walter M. Robertson
May 9, 1942 – June 1945

BG W. K. Harrison
June – Sept 1945

MG Edward M. Almond
Sep 1945 – June 1946

MG Paul W. Kendall
June 1946 – May 24, 1948

MG Harry J. Collins

June 30, 1948 –

Campaigns
Normandy 6 Jun - 24 Jul 1944
Northern France 25 Jul - 14 Sep 1944
Rhineland 15 Sep 1944 - 21 Mar 1945
Ardennes-Alsace 16 Dec 1944 - 25 Jan 1945
Central Europe 22 Mar - 11 May 1945


Medals

Medal of Honor - 6
Silver Star - 741
Bronze Star Medal - 5530
Distinguished Service Cross - 34
Distinguished Service Medal - 1
Legions of Merit - 25
Soldier's Medal - 14
Air Medal - 89






1943
 
Oct-
Training in Northern Ireland and Wales to Jun 44.
1944
 
7 Jun-

Crossed the channel to land on Omaha Beach near St. Laurent-sur-Mer on D plus 1.

10 Jun-
Attacking across the Aure River, the Division liberated Trevieres and proceeded to assault and secure Hill 192, the key enemy strongpoint on the road to St. Lô.
11 Jul-
The Division went on the defensive until July 26.
15 Aug-
Exploiting the St. Lô break-through, the 2nd Division advanced across the Vire to take Tinchebray.
18 Sep-
The Division moved west to join the battle for Brest, the heavily defended fortress surrendering Sep 18, 1944 after a 39-day contest.
19 Sep-
The Division took a brief rest till 26 Sep.
29 Sep-

Moved to defensive positions at St. Vith, Belgium.

3 Oct-
The division entered Germany.
11 Dec-
The Second was ordered to attack and seize the Roer River dams. The German Ardennes offensive in mid-December forced the Division to withdraw to defensive positions near Elsenborn, where the German drive was halted.
1945
 
Feb-
The Division attacked, recapturing lost ground.
4 Mar-
Seized Gemund.
9 Mar-
Reached the Rhine
10-11 Mar-
Advanced south to take Breisig and to guard the Remagen bridge.
21 Mar-
The Division crossed the Rhine and advanced to Hadamar and Limburg an der Lahn.
28 Mar-
Relieved elements of the 9th Armored Division.
6-7 Apr-
Crossed the Weser at Veckerhagen.
8 Apr-
Captured Göttingen.
14 Apr
- Established a bridgehead across the Saale
15 Apr
- Seized Merseburg on April 15.
Apr 18-
Division took Leipzig, mopped up in the area, and outposted the Mulde River.
24 Apr-
Elements which had crossed the river were withdrawn.
1 May-
Relieved on the Mulde, the 2nd moved 200 miles to positions along the German-Czech border near Schonsee and Waldmünchen, where 2 ID relieved the 97th and 99th ID's on 3 May.
4 May-
The division crossed over to Czechoslovakia and attacked in the general direction of Pilsen, attacking that city on VE Day.
20 Jul-
Division returned to the New York Port Of Embarkation.
2 Jul-
Arrived at Camp Swift at Bastrop, Texas to start a training schedule to prepare them to participate in the scheduled invasion of Japan, but they were still at Camp Swift on VJ Day.
1946
 
28 Mar-
Moved to the Staging Area at Camp Stoneman at Pittsburg, California but the move eastward was canceled and they received orders to move to Fort Lewis at Tacoma, Washington.
15 Apr-
Arrived at Fort Lewis which became their Home Station. From their Fort Lewis base, they conducted Arctic, air transportability, amphibious and maneuver training.



2nd Infantry Division
in World War II
CD 1
Open all files from the folders on the CDs
Install Adobe Acrobat PDF Reader from CD 1

The files below are found on CD 1


12-16 Jun 44

2nd Infantry Division
23rd Infantry Regiment
3rd Battalion

Operations in the
Attack on Hill 192,
West of Berigny, France

Normandy
Campaign

CD 1
35 Pages - PDF


11-12 Jul 44

2nd Infantry Division
23rd Infantry Regiment

Operations in the
Attack on Hill 192,
East of St. Lo, France

Normandy
Campaign



CD 1
31 Pages - PDF


13-16 Dec 44

2nd Infantry Division
9th Infantry Regiment
2nd Battalion

Operations in the
Attack on Pillbox Sector
Wehlerscheid, Germany

Rhineland
Campaign


CD 1
33 Pages - PDF


17-20 Dec 44

2nd Infantry Division
38th Infantry Regiment
Company M

Operations in the
Vicinity of
Krinkelt, Belgium

Adrennes - Alsace
Campaign


CD 1
34 Pages - PDF


15-20 Jan 45

2nd Infantry Division
23rd Infantry Regiment
Company G

Operations at
Ondenva, Belgium

Adrennes - Alsace Campaign


CD 1
22 Pages - PDF


17-19 Jan 45

2nd Infantry Division
23rd Infantry Regiment
Company L

Operations in the Ondenval Iveldingen Pass, Belgium

Adrennes - Alsace Campaign

CD 1
30 Pages - PDF

2nd Infantry Division

Conneticut Men1945 Publication
Division History
Roster and stories
of Conneticut





CD 1
16 Pages - PDF


2nd Infantry Division

6 Medal of Honor
Citations

Infantry Division
Citations of WWII
1943 - 1945




CD 1
7 Pages - PDF


Last Offensive





CD 1
554 Pages - PDF


16 Dec 44 - 25 Jan 45

Ardennes - Alsace
Campaign


CD 1
56 Pages - PDF


6 Jun - 24 Jul 44

Normandy
Campaign


CD 1
51 Pages - PDF


War Against Germany
and Mediterranian
and Ajacent Areas

Pictorial Record

CD 1
459 Pages - PDF


Order of Battle

US ARMY
European Theater
of Operations

CD 1
618 Pages - PDF


World War II
Situation Maps

Europe


CD 1
83 Pages - PDF


Chart

Organization
USArmy Regiment


CD 1
1 Page - PDF


Map

United States Map
USArmy Regions


CD 1
1 Page - PDF



World War II
Newspaper
Headlines














CD 1
507 Pages - PDF



Magazine
Covers















CD 1
74 Pages - PDF



Film

The
BIG PICTURE
Documentary Film

"Combat Infantryman"

An Official
Television Report
to the Nation
From the
United States Army




CD 1
Film: 27m14s - MP4



Newsreels

"Allied Vise Tightens
On Rhineland"
Universal Newsreel
7 Dec 44
Film: 7m17s

"Nazis Surrender"
Universal Newsreel
14 May 45
Film: 7m24s

"The Year 1945"
United Newsreel
Film: 8m34s

CD 1
Newsreels - Folder

The files below are found on CD 2


8 Nov - 11 Nov 42

Algeria–French
Morocco

CD 2
32 Pages - PDF


Jul 43

Sicily and the
Surrender of Italy

CD 2
630 Pages - PDF


9 Jul - 17 Aug 43

Sicily Campaign


CD 2
28 Pages - PDF


6 Jun - 1 Jul 44

Cross-Channel Attack


CD 2
538 Pages - PDF


1 Jul - 11 Sep 44

Breakout
and Pursuit

CD 2
771 Pages - PDF


25 Jul - 14 Sep 44

Northern France


CD 2
32 Pages - PDF


15 Sep 44 - 21 Mar 45

Rhineland


CD 2
36 Pages - PDF


22 Mar - 11 May 45

Central Europe


CD 2
36 Pages - PDF


Long Road
To Victory



CD 2
20 Pages - PDF


US Air Force
Combat Chronology
1941 - 1945


CD 2
743 Pages - PDF


"Fighting Divisions"

Army
Divisions History

CD 2
241 Pages - PDF


Supreme Command

European
Theater Operations

CD 2
631 Pages - PDF


Brief History
of World War II





CD 2
55 Pages - PDF


APOs

Army Postal Service
Addresses

Alphabetical Listings

CD 2
149 Pages - PDF


Form SF180
Records Request

Request for
Personnel Records


CD 2
3 Pages - PDF


Research Guide

National Archives
Finding Information of
Personal Participation
in World War II Guide

CD 2
5 Pages - PDF


Mines - Booby Traps
Identification Guide

CD 2
42 Pages - PDF


Aircraft
Nose Art

CD 2
34 Pages - PDF


Aircraft
Recognition Guide

CD 2
17 Pages - PDF



Aircraft
Insignia Poster

CD 2
1 Page - PDF



US
World War II
Posters

CD 2
250 Pages - PDF



German
World War II
Posters

CD 2
75 Pages - PDF



Rank
Insignia of Grade


CD 2
1 Page - PDF


Patch
Identification
Guide

CD 2
19 Pages - PDF


Chart

Enlisted Men's
Uniform Insignias


CD 2
1 Page - PDF


Song Lyrics

Army
HIT KIT
of Popular Songs

CD 2
6 Pages - PDF


VE Day
Eisenhower Flyer




CD 2
1 Page - PDF


Comic Book
Covers




CD 2
8 Pages - PDF
The files below are found on CD 3


Music

"Singing Soldiers"

Winners Second
All Army Soldier
Singing Contest

1954-55
19 Song LP Record
2 Album Set

CD 3
Info - PDF
Files - Folder


Music

What Do You
Do In The Infantry ?

American Military March
Semper Fidelis (Marines)




CD 3
Files - Folder


Radio

DDay
Radio Broadcasts
~
13 - BBC/CBS/NBC
Normandy Invasion
Broadcasts
~
24 - CBS Invasion
1 Hour Broadcasts


CD 3
Files - Folder



Cartoons

11
BANNED
World War II
Cartoons






CD 3
Info - PDF
Files - Folder



2nd Infantry
Division

"Second to None"
"Indian Head"
"Warrior Division"
2nd Infantry Division History

After training in Northern Ireland and Wales from October 1943 to June 1944, the 2nd Infantry Division crossed the channel to land on Omaha Beach on D plus 1, June 7, 1944, near St. Laurent-sur-Mer. Attacking across the Aure River, the Division liberated Trevieres, June 10, and proceeded to assault and secure Hill 192, the key enemy strongpoint on the road to St. Lô. With the hill taken July 11, 1944, the Division went on the defensive until July 26. Exploiting the St. Lô break-through, the 2nd Division advanced across the Vire to take Tinchebray August 15, 1944. The Division then moved west to join the battle for Brest, the heavily defended fortress surrendering September 18, 1944 after a 39-day contest.

The Division took a brief rest September 19–September 26 before moving to defensive positions at St. Vith, Belgium on September 29, 1944. The division entered Germany on October 3, 1944, and the Second was ordered, on December 11, 1944, to attack and seize the Roer River dams. The German Ardennes offensive in mid-December forced the Division to withdraw to defensive positions near Elsenborn, where the German drive was halted. In February 1945 the Division attacked, recapturing lost ground, and seized Gemund, March 4. Reaching the Rhine March 9, the 2ID advanced south to take Breisig, March 10–11, and to guard the Remagen bridge, March 12–March 20.

The Division crossed the Rhine March 21 and advanced to Hadamar and Limburg an der Lahn, relieving elements of the 9th Armored Division, March 28. Advancing rapidly in the wake of the 9th Armored, the 2nd Infantry Division crossed the Weser at Veckerhagen, April 6–April 7, captured Göttingen April 8, established a bridgehead across the Saale, April 14, seizing Merseburg on April 15. On April 18 the Division took Leipzig, mopped up in the area, and outposted the Mulde River; elements which had crossed the river were withdrawn April 24. Relieved on the Mulde, the 2nd moved 200 miles, May 1–May 3, to positions along the German-Czech border near Schonsee and Waldmünchen, where 2 ID relieved the 97th and 99th ID's. The division crossed over to Czechoslovakia on May 4, 1945, and attacked in the general direction of Pilsen, attacking that city on VE Day.

2nd Infantry Division returned to the New York Port Of Embarkation on July 20, 1945, and arrived at Camp Swift at Bastrop, Texas on July 22, 1945. They started a training schedule to prepare them to participate in the scheduled invasion of Japan, but they were still at Camp Swift on VJ Day. They then moved to the Staging Area at Camp Stoneman at Pittsburg, California on March 28, 1946, but the move eastward was canceled, and they received orders to move to Fort Lewis at Tacoma, Washington. They arrived at Fort Lewis on April 15, 1946, which became their Home Station. From their Fort Lewis base, they conducted Arctic, air transportability, amphibious, and maneuver training.



9th Infantry
" Keep Up The Fire!"
Regiment
9th Infantry Regiment History

After breaking out from the beachhead at Normandy, the 9th waged an 18 hour engagement during the Battle of the Bulge. With the Allied line established, the 9th spearheaded a drive toward the Siegfried Line, crossed the Rhine in March 1945 and advanced rapidly through Saxony into Czechoslovakia, ending the war with many decorations including three Presidential Unit Citations.

Stationed at Ft. Sam Houstin Tex as part of 2nd Division.

24 Nov 42 - Moved to Cp McCoy Wis.

27 Sep 43 - Staged at Cp. Shanks N.Y.

8 Oct 43 - Departed New York P/E.

19 Oct 43- Arrived England.

12 June 44 - Landed in France.

3 Oct 44 - Crossed into Belgium and entered Germany same date.

19 Jul 45 - Arrived Boston P/E.

23 Jul 45 - Moved to Cp Swift Tex.

29 Mar 46 - Transferred to Cp. Stoneman Cal.

16 Apr 46 - Transferred to Ft. Lewis Wash where active through 1946.



23rd Infantry
" Tomahawks"
"We Serve"

Regiment

23rd Infantry Regiment History

Stationed at Ft. Sam Houstin Tex as part of 2nd Division.

24 Nov 42 - Moved on to Cp McCoy Wis..

29 Sep 43 - Staged at Cp. Shanks N.Y.

8 Oct 43 - Departed New York P/E.

18 Oct 43 - Arrived England 18 Oct 43.

12 June 44 - Landed in France.

3 Oct 44 - Crossed into Belgium and entered Germany same date.

16-18 Dec 44 - Attached 99th Infantry Division.

13-24 Jan 45 - Attached 1st Infantry Division.

20 Jul 45 - Returned New York.

25 Jul 45 - Moved to Cp. Swift, Tex.

30 Mar 46 - Transferred to Cp. Stoneman, Cal.

16 Apr 46 - Transferred to Ft. Lewis Wash. where active thru 1946.



38th Infantry
"Rock of the Marne"
Regiment
38th Infantry Regiment History

16 Oct 39 - Stationed at Ft. Douglas Utah as part of the 3rd Division until assigned to 2nd Division.

9 Nov 39 - Moved to Cp. Bullis Tex where participated in maneuvers.

27 Jan 40 - Moved to Ft. Sam Houstin where participated in maneuvers.

24 Nov 42 - Transferred to Cp McCoy.

30 Sep 43 - Staged at Cp. Shanks N.Y. 30 Sep 43.

8 Oct 43 - Departed New York P/E.

19 Oct 43 - Arrived England.

12 Jan 44 - Landed in France.

21-30 Aug 44 - Attached VIII Corps.

3 Oct 44 - Crossed into Belgium and entered Germany same date.

8 Mar 45 - Attached 78th Infantry Division.

25 Mar-5 Apr 45 - Attached 9th Armored Division.

5 May 45 - Crossed into Czechoslovakia.

20 Jul 45 - Returned to New York P/E.

25 Jul 45 - Moved to Cp. Swift Texas.

28 Apr 46 - Transferred to Cp. Carson Coloado where active through 1946.



2nd Infantry
Division

Campaigns
Campaigns of World War II
Normandy 6 Jun - 24 Jul 1944
Northern France 25 Jul - 14 Sep 1944
Rhineland 15 Sep 1944 - 21 Mar 1945
Ardennes-Alsace 16 Dec 1944 - 25 Jan 1945
Central Europe 22 Mar - 11 May 1945

Normandy Campaign
6 – 24 July 1944

A great invasion force stood off the Normandy coast of France as dawn broke on 6 June 1944: 9 battleships, 23 cruisers, 104 destroyers, and 71 large landing craft of various descriptions as well as troop transports, mine sweepers, and merchantmen—in all, nearly 5,000 ships of every type, the largest armada ever assembled. The naval bombardment that began at 0550 that morning detonated large minefields along the shoreline and destroyed a number of the enemy’s defensive positions. To one correspondent, reporting from the deck of the cruiser HMS Hillary, it sounded like “the rhythmic beating of a gigantic drum” all along the coast. In the hours following the bombardment, more than 100,000 fighting men swept ashore to begin one of the epic assaults of history, a “mighty endeavor,” as President Franklin D. Roosevelt described it to the American people, “to preserve. . . our civilization and to set free a suffering humanity.”


Northern France Campaign
25 July – 14 September 1944

As July 1944 entered its final week, Allied forces in Normandy faced, at least on the surface, a most discouraging situation. In the east, near Caen, the British and Canadians were making little progress against fierce German resistance. In the west, American troops were bogged down in the Norman hedgerows. These massive, square walls of earth, five feet high and topped by hedges, had been used by local farmers over the centuries to divide their fields and protect their crops and cattle from strong ocean winds. The Germans had turned these embankments into fortresses, canalizing the American advance into narrow channels, which were easily covered by antitank weapons and machine guns. The stubborn defenders were also aided by some of the worst weather seen in Normandy since the turn of the century, as incessant downpours turned country lanes into rivers of mud. By 25 July, the size of the Allied beachhead had not even come close to the dimensions that pre–D-day planners had anticipated, and the slow progress revived fears in the Allied camp of a return to the static warfare of World War I. Few would have believed that, in the space of a month and a half, Allied armies would stand triumphant at the German border.


Rhineland Campaign
15 September 1944 – 21 March 1945

The Rhineland Campaign, although costly for the Allies, had clearly been ruinous for the Germans. The Germans suffered some 300,000 casualties and lost vast amounts of irreplaceable equipment. Hitler, having demanded the defense of all of the German homeland, enabled the Allies to destroy the Wehrmacht in the West between the Siegfried Line and the Rhine River. Now, the Third Reich lay virtually prostrate before Eisenhower’s massed armies.


Ardennes - Alsace Campaign
16 December 1944 – 25 January 1945

In August 1944, while his armies were being destroyed in Normandy, Hitler secretly put in motion actions to build a large reserve force, forbidding its use to bolster Germany’s beleaguered defenses. To provide the needed manpower, he trimmed existing military forces and conscripted youths, the unfit, and old men previously untouched for military service during World War II.

In September Hitler named the port of Antwerp, Belgium, as the objective. Selecting the Eifel region as a staging area, Hitler intended to mass twenty-five divisions for an attack through the thinly held Ardennes Forest area of southern Belgium and Luxembourg. Once the Meuse River was reached and crossed, these forces would swing northwest some 60 miles to envelop the port of Antwerp. The maneuver was designed to sever the already stretched Allied supply lines in the north and to encircle and destroy a third of the Allies’ ground forces. If successful, Hitler believed that the offensive could smash the Allied coalition, or at least greatly cripple its ground combat capabilities, leaving him free to focus on the Russians at his back door.


Central Europe Campaign
22 March – 11 May 1945

By the beginning of the Central Europe Campaign of World War II, Allied victory in Europe was inevitable. Having gambled his future ability to defend Germany on the Ardennes offensive and lost, Hitler had no real strength left to stop the powerful Allied armies. Yet Hitler forced the Allies to fight, often bitterly, for final victory. Even when the hopelessness of the German situation became obvious to his most loyal subordinates, Hitler refused to admit defeat. Only when Soviet artillery was falling around his Berlin headquarters bunker did the German Fuehrer begin to perceive the final outcome of his megalomaniacal crusade.


For Mac or PC computer use. A monograph is a work of writing or essay or book on a specific subject and may be released in the manner of a book or journal article. Files copied from books and the National Archives and are 'as is' and may be incomplete or unreadable in parts. For Special Requests or more information about this or any of my other "Researching WWII" CDs like it, send an email to Hello@MtMestas.com .