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45th Infantry
"Thunderbird"
Division

Order of Battle

157th Infantry Regiment
179th Infantry Regiment
180th Infantry Regiment

45th Infantry Division Artillery
158th Field Artillery Battalion (105mm)
160th Field Artillery Battalion (105mm)
171st Field Artillery Battalion (105mm)
189th Field Artillery Battalion (155mm)

45th Reconnaissance Troop (Mechanized)
120th Engineer Combat Battalion
120th Medical Battalion
45th Infantry Division Military Police Platoon
45th Infantry Division Special Troops

45th Quartermaster Company
45th Signal Company
700th Ordnance Light Maintenance Compan
45th Counter Intelligence Corps Detachment



Casualties
Killed - 1,510
Wounded - 7,246
Missing - 1,436
Captured - 266
Battle Casualties - 10,458
Non-Battle Casualties - 15, 991
Total Casualties - 26,449



Commanders

Maj. Gen. William S. Key
September 1940 - October 1942

Maj. Gen. Troy H. Middleton
October 1942 - December 1943

Maj. Gen. William W. Eagles
December 1943 - December 1944

Maj. Gen. Robert T. Frederick
December 1944 - September 1945

Brig. Gen. Henry J. D. Meyer
September 1945 - Inactivation



Campaigns
Sicily 9 Jul - 17 Aug 43
Naples-Foggia 9 Sep 43 - 21 Jan 44
Anzio 22 Jan - 24 May 44
Rome-Arno 22 Jan - 9 Sep 44
Southern France 15 Aug - 14 Sep 44
Rhineland 15 Sep 44 - 21 Mar 45
Ardennes-Alsace 16 Dec 44 - 25 Jan 45
Central Europe 22 Mar - 11 May 45



Medals
Medal of Honor Recepients - 8
Distinguished Service Cross - 54
Legion of Merit - 30
Silver Star - 1,230
Soldiers Medal - 36
Bronze Star - 3,314
Air Medal - 53

Distinguished Unit Citations - 7

Days of Combat - 511



Medal of Honor Recepients

Van T. Barfoot, 2nd Lt.
157th Infantry - 45th Infantry Division
nr. Carano, Italy
May 23, 1944

Ernest Childers, 2nd Lt.
45th Infantry Division
Oliveto, Italy
September 22, 1943

Almond E. Fisher, 2nd Lt.
Company E, 157th Infantry - 45th Infantry Division
nr. Grammont, France
September 12-13, 1944

William J. Johnston, Pfc.
Company G, 180th Infantry - 45th Infantry Division
nr. Padiglione, Italy
February 17-19, 1944

Jack C. Montgomery, 1st Lt.
45th Infantry Division
nr. Padiglione, Italy
February 22, 1944

James D. Slaton, Cpl.
157th Infantry - 45th Infantry Division
nr. Oliveto, Italy
September 23, 1943

Jack L. Treadwell, Cpt.
Company F, 180th Infantry - 45th Infantry Division
nr. Nieder-Wurzbach, Germany
March 18, 1945

Edward G. Wilkin, Cpl.
Company C, 157th Infantry - 45th Infantry Division
Siegfried Line in Germany
March 18, 1945





1942
 
14 Jan-
The first contingent of the 34th Division embarks at Brooklyn.
1940
 
16 Sep-
The 45th Infantry Division was federalized into the Active duty force.
1942
 
15 Aug-
Division reconstituted as the 45th Airborne activated at Camp Claiborne, Louisiana.
Oct-
Division moved to Fort Bragg, North Carolina and began its training under the Airborne Command and trained at Fort Sill, Camp Barkeley, Fort Devens, Pine Camp and Camp Pickett. The division trained in amphibious assault techniques at Fort Devens in preparation for the invasion of Italy.
1943
 
8 Jun-
The Division sailed for the Mediterranean region.
22 Jun-
The 45th Division landed in North Africa and trained at Arzew, French Morocco.
10 Jul-
The Division was one of the leading units in the amphibious assault on Sicily.
26 Jul-
Division fought for four days to defeat Italian and German forces on Motta Hill.
1 Aug-
The Division withdrew from the front line for rest and rear-guard patrol duty.
10 Sep-
The Division conducted its second landing at Agropoli and Paestrom.
17 Sep-
The 45th pushed to the Calore River after a week of heavy fighting.
20 Sep-
American forces were finally able to break out and establish a more secure beachhead.
3 Nov-
Division crossed the Volturno River and took Venafro.
1944
 
9 Jan-
The division inched forward into the mountains reaching St. Elia, north of Cassino, before moving to a rest area.
30 Jan-
VI Corps moved out, it encountered heavy resistance and for the next four months the division stood its ground during repeated German counterattacks.
23 May-
The Division went on the offensive, crossing the Tiber River by June 4.
16 Jun-
Division withdrew for rest in preparation for another assault.
15 Aug-
The Division landed at St. Maxime, France during Operation Dragoon.
12 Sep-
Seventh Army and the Third United States Army advance from Normandy and spearhead the drive for the Belfort Gap.
24 Sep-
Took the strongly defended city of Epinal.
30 Sep-
Division crossed the Moselle River and entered the western foothills of the Vosges, taking Rambervillers.
23 Oct-
Division remained in the area a month waiting for other units to catch up before crossing the Mortagne River.
25 Nov-
After a one month rest the Division resumed its advance attacking the forts north of Mutzig and crossed the Zintzel River and pushed through the Maginot defenses.
1945
 
1 Jan-
The 45th Infantry Division was reassigned to VI Corps on New Year's day.
2 Jan-
The Division fought defensively along the German border, withdrawing to the Moder River.
17 Feb-
TheDivision was pulled off the line for rest and training.
17 Mar-
The 45th moved north to the Sarreguemines area and smashed through the Siegfried Line.
21 Mar-
Homburg taken.
26 Mar-
Crossed the Rhine between Worms and Hamm.
3 Apr-
Aschaffenburg falls
20 Apr-
Nuremberg falls.
27 Apr-
The Division crossed the Danube River and liberated 32,000 captives of the Dachau concentration camp.
29 Apr-
The Division captured Munich during the next two days, occupying the city until V-E Dayand the surrender of Germany.
May-
The Division remained in Munich and set up collection points and camps for the massive numbers of surrendering troops of the German armies.
Jun-
The Division returned to New York and from there went to Camp Bowie, Texas.
7 Dec-
The Division was deactivated from the active duty force.
1946
 
10 Sep-
The 45th Infantry Division was reconstituted as a National Guard unit.


45th Infantry Division
in World War II

CD 1
Open all files from the folders on the CDs
Install Adobe Acrobat PDF Reader from CD 1

The files below are found on CD 1


GI Stories

History of the
45th Infantry Division






CD 1

39 Pages - PDF


1 Jul - 22 Aug 43

45th-Infantry Division

Sicilian Campaign
G3 Journal

Operation Husky
Part 1

CD 1
28 Pages - PDF


13 - 14 Jul 43

45th Infantry Division
179th Infantry Regiment

Operations
Grammicele, Siciliy



CD 1
27 Pages - PDF


2 Nov 43 - 3 Jan 44

45th Infantry Division
180th Infantry Regiment

Operations
Venafro to Casale
, Italy



CD 1

25 Pages - PDF


22 Jan - 31 May 44

The German
Operation at Anzio






CD 1
167 Pages - PDF


7 - 8 Feb 44

45th Infantry Division
157th Infantry Regiment

Operations
Moletta River Line

Anzio Campaign

CD 1
32 Pages - PDF


16 Feb 44

45th Infantry Division
179th Infantry Regiment

Infantry in Defense
of a Wide Front



CD 1

115 Pages - PDF


22 - 24 May 44

45th Infantry Division
157th Infantry Regiment

Operations
Battle at Anzio

Anzio Campaign

CD 1
24 Pages - PDF


15 Mar 45

45th Infantry Division
157th Infantry Regimet

Regiment in a
Night Attack

Palatinate, France

CD 1
30 Pages - PDF


17 - 20 Apr 45

45th Infantry Division
180th Infantry Regiment

Operations
Nuremberg, Germany



CD 1
43 Pages - PDF


45th Infantry Division

Conneticut Men

History





CD 1

16 Pages - PDF


Order of Battle

US ARMY
European Theater
of Operations





CD 1
618 Pages - PDF


9 Jul - 17 Aug 43

Sicily
Campaign

CD 1

29 Pages - PDF


Sicily and the
Surrender of Italy



CD 1
630 Pages - PDF


9 Sep 43 - 21 Jan 44

Naples-Foggia
Campaign

CD 1
32 Pages - PDF


22 Jan - 24 May 44

Anzio
Campaign

CD 1
28 Pages - PDF


22 Jan - 9 Sep 44

Rome-Arno
Campaign

CD 1
31 Pages - PDF


15 Aug - 14 Sep 44

Southern France
Campaign

CD 1
32 Pages - PDF


15 Sep 44 - 21 Mar 45

Rhineland
Campaign

CD 1
36 Pages - PDF


16 Dec 44 - 25 Jan 45

Ardennes-Alsace
Campaign

CD 1
56 Pages - PDF


The Ardennes
Battle of the Bulge



CD 1

00 - Pages - PDF


22 Mar - 11 May 45

Central Europe
Campaign

CD 1
36 Pages - PDF


Pictorial Record
War Against
Germany Europe
and Adjacent Areas

CD 1
458 Pages - PDF


1941 - 1945
US Army
World War II
Chronology

CD 1
672 Pages - PDF


Research Guide
National Archives
Finding Information of
Personal Participation
in World War II Guide

CD 1
5 Pages - PDF


Form SF-180
Records Request

Request for
Personnel Records

CD 1
3 Pages - PDF


Guide to
Research Resources Relating to
World War II


CD 1
20 Pages - PDF


World War II
Situation Maps

Europe


CD 1
82 Pages - PDF
The files below are found on CD 2


VE Day
Eisenhower Flyer



CD 2
1 Page - PDF


Rank
Insignia of Grade



CD 2
1 Page - PDF


Chart

Enlisted Men's
Uniform Insignias

CD 2
1 Page - PDF


Patch
Identification
Guide


CD 2
19 Pages - PDF


Mines - Booby Traps
Identification Guide

CD 2
80 Pages - PDF


Aircraft
Nose Art

CD 2
34 Pages - PDF


Aircraft
Recognition Guide

CD 2
17 Pages - PDF



Aircraft
Insignia Poster

CD 2
1 Page - PDF



US
World War II
Posters



CD 2
249 Pages - PDF



German
World War II
Posters



CD 2
75 Pages - PDF



Comic Book
Covers




CD 2
8 Pages - PDF


Song Lyrics

Army
HIT KIT
of Popular Songs

CD 2
6 Pages - PDF


Troopships
of World War II















CD 2
391 Pages - PDF


British
Grenadier Guards
1939 - 1945

Campaigns

BEF - 1939 - 1940
Tunisia 1942 - 1943
Italy - 1943 - 1945
Europe 1944 - 1945







CD 2
93 Pages - PDF


Film

The
BIG PICTURE
Documentary Film

"Combat Infantryman"

An Official
Television Report
to the Nation
From the
United States Army



CD 2
Film Info - PDF
Film: 27m14s - MP4


Newsreels

"Allied Vise Tightens
On Rhineland"
Universal Newsreel
7 Dec 44
Film: 7m17s

"Nazis Surrender"
Universal Newsreel
14 May 45
Film: 7m24s

"The Year 1945"
United Newsreel
Film: 8m34s

CD 2
Newsreels - Folder


1 Sep 39 - 10 May 42

Graphic History
Of The War





CD 2
76 Pages - PDF


1985

Veterans
Remerbrances
of World War II

40th Anniversary
of VE Day

CD 2
141 Pages - PDF


Brief History
of World War II







CD 2
55 Pages - PDF


APOs

Army
Postal Service
Addresses




CD 2
149 Pages - PDF
The files below are found on CD 3


Music

"Singing Soldiers"

Winners Second
All Army Soldier
Singing Contest

1954-55
19 Song LP Record
2 Album Set


CD 3
Info - PDF
Files - Folder


Music

What Do You
Do In The Infantry ?

American Military March
Semper Fidelis (Marines)







CD 3
Files - Folder


D-Day
Radio Broadcasts

13 - BBC/CBS/NBC
Normandy Invasion
Broadcasts

24 - CBS Invasion
1 Hour Broadcasts





CD 3
Files - Folder



Cartoons

11
BANNED
World War II
Cartoons

Bugs Bunny
Donald Duck
Popeye
Superman
more ...

CD 3
Info - PDF
Files - Folder



45th Infantry
"Thunderbird"
Division

45th Infantry Division History

The 45th Division landed in North Africa, 22 June 1943, and trained at Arzew, French Morocco.

It landed in Sicily, 10 July, in its first major amphibious operation and moved inland under minor opposition. The enemy resisted fiercely at Motta Hill, 26 July, before losing the fourday battle of "Bloody Ridge." On 1 August, the Division withdrew for rest and patrols.

On 10 September 1943, the second landing at Salerno occurred. Against stiff resistance, the 45th pushed to the Calore River, 27 September, crossed the Volturno River, 3 November, and took Venafro. Until 9 January 1944, the Division inched forward into the mountains reaching St. Elia north of Cassino before moving to a rest area.

The 45th landed at Anzio, 22 January 1944, and for 4 months stood its ground against violent assaults. It went over to the attack, 23 May, crossed the Tiber River, 4 June, outflanking Rome and withdrew for rest and training on the 16th.

The 45th participated in its fourth assault landing, 15 August 1944, at St. Maxime in Southern France. Against slight opposition, it spearheaded the drive for the Belfort Gap. It took the strongly defended city of Epinal, 24 September, crossed the Moselle River and entered the western foothills of the Vosges, taking Rambervillers on the 30th, and crossing the Mortagne River, 23 October.

After a brief rest the 45th cracked the forts north of Mutzig, an anchor of the Maginot Line, 25 November, crossed the Zintzel River and pushed through the Maginot defenses.

From 2 January 1945, the Division fought defensively along the German border, withdrawing to the Moder River. On 17 February, it went back for rest and training.

The 45th moved north to the Sarreguemines area and smashed at the Siegfried Line, 17 March, taking Homburg on the 21st and crossing the Rhine between Worms and Hamm on the 26th. The advance continued, Aschaffenburg falling, 3 April, and Nurnberg on the 20th. The Division crossed the Danube, 27 April, took Munich on the 30th and as war ended was stationed near Dachau.



45th Infantry
Division

Campaigns of World War II

Sicily 9 Jul - 17 Aug 43
Naples-Foggia 9 Sep 43 - 21 Jan 44
Anzio 22 Jan - 24 May 44
Rome-Arno 22 Jan - 9 Sep 44
Southern France 15 Aug - 14 Sep 44
Rhineland 15 Sep 44 - 21 Mar 45
Ardennes-Alsace 16 Dec 44 - 25 Jan 45
Central Europe 22 Mar - 11 May 45


Sicily Campaign
9 July - 17 August 1943

On the night of 9–10 July 1943, an Allied armada of 2,590 vessels launched one of the largest combined operations of World War II—the invasion of Sicily. Over the next thirty-eight days, half a million Allied soldiers, sailors, and airmen grappled with their German and Italian counterparts for control of this rocky outwork of Hitler’s “Fortress Europe.” When the struggle was over, Sicily became the first piece of the Axis homeland to fall to Allied forces during World War II. More important, it served as both a base for the invasion of Italy and as a training ground for many of the officers and enlisted men who eleven months later landed on the beaches of Normandy.


Naples - Foggia
9 September 1943 - 21 January 1944

The Allied goals, established before the invasion of Italy, were to gain control of the Mediterranean, keep pressure on the Germans while building for the cross-Channel attack, and force Italy to withdraw from the war. All agreed that bases in Italy would provide support for the air war against German sources of supply in the Balkans and the German industrial heartland itself. These sound strategic goals were valid in 1943 and have stood the test of time. By late August, the Italian government had decided to withdraw from the war and break relations with Germany. The fall of Sicily had enhanced Allied control of the Mediterranean but had not assured it. Prior to the invasion of Italy, therefore, the Allied goals were far from being totally satisfied, and an eager world watched as the Allies launched first Operation BAYTOWN and then Operation AVALANCHE to invade the European continent.


Anzio
22 January - 24 May 1944

The four months of this campaign would see some of the most savage fighting of World War II.

Following the successful Allied landings at Calabria, Taranto, and Salerno in early September 1943 and the unconditional surrender of Italy that same month, German forces had quickly disarmed their former allies and begun a slow, fighting withdrawal to the north. Defending two hastily prepared, fortified belts stretching from coast to coast, the Germans significantly slowed the Allied advance before settling into the Gustav Line, a third, more formidable and sophisticated defensive belt of interlocking positions on the high ground along the peninsula’s narrowest point.

During the four months of the Anzio Campaign the Allied VI Corps suffered over 29,200 combat casualties (4,400 killed, 18,000 wounded, 6,800 prisoners or missing) and 37,000 noncombat casualties. Two-thirds of these losses, amounting to 17 percent of VI Corps’ effective strength, were inflicted between the initial landings and the end of the German counteroffensive on 4 March. Of the combat casualties, 16,200 were Americans (2,800 killed, 11,000 wounded, 2,400 prisoners or missing) as were 26,000 of the Allied noncombat casualties. German combat losses, suffered wholly by the Fourteenth Army, were estimated at 27,500 (5,500 killed, 17,500 wounded, and 4,500 prisoners or missing), figures very similar to Allied losses.

The Anzio Campaign continues to be controversial, just as it was during its planning and implementation stages. The operation, according to U.S. Army Center of Military History historian Clayton D. Laurie, clearly failed in its immediate objectives of outflanking the Gustav Line, restoring mobility to the Italian campaign, and speeding the capture of Rome.

Yet the campaign did accomplish several goals. The presence of a significant Allied force behind the German main line of resistance, uncomfortably close to Rome, represented a constant threat. The Germans could not ignore Anzio and were forced into a response, thereby surrendering the initiative in Italy to the Allies. The 135,000 troops of the Fourteenth Army surrounding Anzio could not be moved elsewhere, nor could they be used to make the already formidable Gustav Line virtually impregnable.



Rome - Arno
22 January - 9 September 1944

The Allied operations in Italy between January and September 1944 were essentially an infantryman’s war where the outcome was decided by countless bitterly fought small unit actions waged over some of Europe’s most difficult terrain under some of the worst weather conditions found anywhere during World War II.



Southern France
15 August - 14 September 1944

The Allied invasion of southern France in the late summer of 1944, an operation first code-named ANVIL and later DRAGOON, marked the beginning of one of the most successful but controversial campaigns of World War II. However, because it fell both geographically and chronologically between two much larger Allied efforts in northern France and Italy, both its conduct and its contributions have been largely ignored. Planned originally as a simultaneous complement to OVERLORD, the cross-Channel attack on Normandy, ANVIL actually took place over two months later, on 15 August 1944, making it appear almost an afterthought to the main Allied offensive in northern Europe. Yet the success of ANVIL and the ensuing capture of the great southern French ports of Toulon and Marseille, together with the subsequent drive north up the Rhone River valley to Lyon and Dijon, were ultimately to provide critical support to the Normandy-based armies finally moving east toward the German border.



Rhineland
15 September 1944 - 21 March 1945

The Rhineland Campaign, although costly for the Allies, had clearly been ruinous for the Germans. The Germans suffered some 300,000 casualties and lost vast amounts of irreplaceable equipment. Hitler, having demanded the defense of all of the German homeland, enabled the Allies to destroy the Wehrmacht in the West between the Siegfried Line and the Rhine River. Now, the Third Reich lay virtually prostrate before Eisenhower’s massed armies.



Ardennes - Alsace
16 December 1944 - 25 January 1945

In August 1944, while his armies were being destroyed in Normandy, Hitler secretly put in motion actions to build a large reserve force, forbidding its use to bolster Germany’s beleaguered defenses. To provide the needed manpower, he trimmed existing military forces and conscripted youths, the unfit, and old men previously untouched for military service during World War II.

In September Hitler named the port of Antwerp, Belgium, as the objective. Selecting the Eifel region as a staging area, Hitler intended to mass twenty-five divisions for an attack through the thinly held Ardennes Forest area of southern Belgium and Luxembourg. Once the Meuse River was reached and crossed, these forces would swing northwest some 60 miles to envelop the port of Antwerp. The maneuver was designed to sever the already stretched Allied supply lines in the north and to encircle and destroy a third of the Allies’ ground forces. If successful, Hitler believed that the offensive could smash the Allied coalition, or at least greatly cripple its ground combat capabilities, leaving him free to focus on the Russians at his back door.


Central Europe
22 March - 11 May 1945

By the beginning of the Central Europe Campaign of World War II, Allied victory in Europe was inevitable. Having gambled his future ability to defend Germany on the Ardennes offensive and lost, Hitler had no real strength left to stop the powerful Allied armies. Yet Hitler forced the Allies to fight, often bitterly, for final victory. Even when the hopelessness of the German situation became obvious to his most loyal subordinates, Hitler refused to admit defeat. Only when Soviet artillery was falling around his Berlin headquarters bunker did the German Fuehrer begin to perceive the final outcome of his megalomaniacal crusade.



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