Researching
World War II

Unit Histories, Documents
Monographs, Books and Reports on CD
PDF Remastered and Keyword Searchable



4th Infantry
Division

"Ivy Division"
"Famous Fourth"



8th Infantry
"Fighting Eagles"
Regiment




History


12th Infantry
"Red Warriors"
"Lethal Warriors"
Regiment


History


22nd Infantry
"Deeds, Not Words"
Regiment




History

Order of Battle
8th Infantry Regiment
12th Infantry Regiment
22nd Infantry Regiment

20th Field Artillery Battalion (155 mm)
29th Field Artillery Battalion (105 mm)
42nd Field Artillery Battalion (105 mm)
44th Field Artillery Battalion (105 mm)

4th Reconnaissance Troop
4th Engineer Battalion
4th Medical Battalion
4th Quartermaster Battalion
4th Signal Company
704th Ordnance Company




Casualties
Killed in Action - 4,097
Wounded in Action - 17,371
Died of Wounds - 757




Commanders
Maj. Gen. H. W. Baird
Apr 41 - May 42
Maj. Gen. J. S. Wood
May 42 - Dec 44
Maj. Gen. Hugh J. Gaffey
Dec 44 - Mar 45
Maj. Gen. W. M. Hoge
Mar - Jun 45
Brig. Gen. Bruce C. Clarke
Jun - July 45
Brig. Gen. W. Lyn Roberts
Jul - Sep 45
Maj. Gen. F. B. Prickett
Sep 45 to inactivation



Campaigns
Normandy
6 Jun - 24 Jul 44
Northern France
25 Jul - 14 Sep 44
Rhineland
15 Sep 44 - 21 Mar 45
Ardennes-Alsace
16 Dec 44 - 25 Jan 45
Central Europe
22 Mar - 11 May 45



Days of Combat
230




Medals
Distinguished Unit Citations
1
Medal of Honor
3
Distinguished Service Cross
45
Distinguished Service Medal
3
Silver Star
757
Legionaires Medal
27
Soldiers Medal
17
Bronze Star Medal
3,918
AM
95





1940

 
 1 Jun-
The 4th Infantry Division was reactivated at Fort Benning, Georgia as part of the U.S. Army buildup prior to the country's entry into World War II.
 Jun-

The 4th served as an experimental division for the Army, testing new equipment and tactics to Oct 43.

1944
 
 Jan-
The Division arrived in the UK.
6 Jan-

The Division moved to England in January of 1944 to prepare for Operation Overlord, the D-Day landings in Normandy.

 6 Jun-
The invasion of Europe began in the Normandy invasion landings at Utah Beach. The Division's 8th Infantry Regiment was the first Allied ground unit to assault German forces on the Normandy Beaches. For 26 days the Division pushed inland, reaching the Port of Cherbourg and sustaining over 5,000 casualties.
 25 Jun-
Relieving the isolated 82d Airborne Division at Sainte-Mère-Église, the 4th cleared the Cotentin peninsula and took part in the capture of Cherbourg.
 6 Jul-
After taking part in the fighting near Periers the Division broke through the left flank of the German Seventh Army, helped stem the German drive toward Avranches,
 Aug-
By the end of August the Division moved to Paris.
 Sep-
The Division moved on through northern France reaching Belgium and the border of Germany.
 14 Sep-

The 4th moved into Belgium through Houffalize to attack the Siegfried Line at Schnee Eifel.

 4 Nov-
The division entered the Battle of Hurtgen Forest, where it was engaged in heavy fighting until early December, crossed the Rhine, then the Danube, and finally ceased its advance at the Isar River in southern Germany.
 16 Dec-

The Division shifted to Luxembourg.

1945
 
 Jan-
Although its lines were dented, it managed to hold the Germans at Dickweiler and Osweiler and overran German positions in Fouhren and Vianden.
 Feb-
The Division halted at the Prüm River in February by heavy enemy resistance.
 28 Feb-
The division crossed near Olzheim.
 7 Mar-
The Division raced on across the Kyll..
 29 Mar-

After a short rest, the 4th moved across the Rhine at Worms and attacked and secured Würzburg.

 3 Apr-
The 4th established a bridgehead across the Main at Ochsenfurt.
 2 May-
The division had reached Miesbach on the Isar when it was relieved and placed on occupation duty.
 Jul-
The division returned to the United States in July and was stationed at Camp Butner North Carolina, preparing for deployment to the Pacific, however, the Japanese surrendered before the 4th ID was deployed.
1946
 
 5 Mar-
After the war ended it was inactivated.



4th Infantry Division
in World War II

CD 1
Open all files from the folders on the CDs
Install Adobe Acrobat PDF Reader from CD 1

The files below are found on CD 1


20 Mar 44

Eisenhhower
SHAEF Meeting
Minutes





CD 1
3 Pages - PDF


Jun 44


Amphibious Operations

Invasion of
Nothern France

Western Task Force
United States Fleet

CD 1
13 Pages - PDF


2 - 18 Jun 44

4th Infantry Division

Operations 899th
Tank Destroyer
Battalion In Close
Support Of Infantry

Normandy Campaign

CD 1
21 Pages - PDF


5 Jun 44

DDay

Operation Overlord
Plans and Preparations





CD 1
46 Pages - PDF


6 - 7 Jun 44

Operations
VII Corps 1st Army

Landing Utah Beach

Establishing Beachhead By Amphibious And Airborne Assault

CD 1
28 Pages - PDF


6 Jun 44

Armor in
Operation Neptune

Establishment of
Normandy Beachhead




CD 1
355 Pages - PDF


5 Jul 44

Army Talks

Notes
From Normandy





CD 1
9 Pages - PDF


25 Jul - 1 Aug 44



Operations 1st Army
St. Lo Breakthrough

Northern France
Campaign


CD 1
24 Pages - PDF


Sep 44

1st Army

After Action Report








CD 1
48 Pages - PDF


Oct 44

1st Army

After Action Report








CD 1
53 Pages - PDF


16 Nov - 3 Dec 44

4th Infantry Division

Operations of the
22nd Infantry Regiment

Regiment
In The Attack

Hurtgen Forest,
Germany

CD 1
28 Pages - PDF


16 Dec 44 - 2 Jan 45

France

German Ardennes
Counter Offensive

Ardennes-Alsace
Campaign




CD 1
36 Pages - PDF


28 Feb - 1 Mar 45

4th Infantry Division

Operations
8th Infantry Regiment

Olzheim, Germany

CD 1
46 Pages - PDF


28 Mar - 18 Apr 45

1st US Army and
9th US Army

Operations In Encirclement And
Capture Of The Ruhr

CD 1
20 Pages - PDF


4th Infantry Division

Connecticut Men






CD 1
16 Pages - PDF


Brief History
of World War II







CD 1
55 Pages - PDF


France

DDay-Photos




CD 1
315 Pages - PDF


Form SF180
Records Request

Request for
Personnel Records


CD 1
3 Pages - PDF


Finding Information
Personal Participation
In World War 2




CD 1
5 Pages - PDF


National Gallery
of Art - Washington

A Guide to
Research Resources
to World War II

CD 1
20 Pages - PDF


Rank
Insignia of Grade



CD 1
1 Page - PDF


Shoulder Patch
Insignias of the
US Armed Forces


CD 1
19 Pages - PDF


Chart

Uniform Insignias
Guide

CD 1
1 Page - PDF


Europe
Stategic Maps



CD 1
82 Pages - PDF


6 Jun - 1 Jul 44

Cross Channel Attack

Introduction to Campaigns of ETO

CD 1
538 Pages - PDF


6 Jun - 24 Jul 44

Normandy
Campaign



CD 1
51 Pages - PDF


1 Jul - 10 Sep 44

Breakout and Pursuit

Follows 1st USArmy Through 10 Sep 44

CD 1
771 Pages - PDF


25 Jul - 14 Sep 44

Northern France
Campaign



CD 1
32 Pages - PDF


11 Sep - 16 Dec 44

Siegfried Line
Campaign



CD 1
697 Pages - PDF


15 Sep 44 - 21 Mar 45

Rhineland
Campaign



CD 1
36 Pages - PDF


16 Dec 44 - 25 Jan 45

France

Ardennes-Alsace
Campaign

CD 1
36 Pages - PDF


22 Mar - 11 May 45

Central Europe
Campaign



CD 1
36 Pages - PDF
The files below are found on CD 2


Supreme Command

European
Theater Operations

CD 2
631 Pages - PDF


The
War Illustrated



CD 2
31 Issues - PDF


Aircraft
Insignia Poster



CD 2
1 Page - PDF


Aircraft
Nose Art



CD 2
34 Pages - PDF


Aircraft
Recognition Guide



CD 2
17 Pages - PDF


APOs

Army Postal Service
Addresses

CD 2
149 Pages - PDF


Comic Book
Covers



CD 2
8 Pages - PDF


6 Jun 44

SHAEF-Marshall


CD 2
1 Page - PDF


"Fighting Divisions"

Army
Divisions History


CD 2
241 Pages - PDF


Song Lyrics

Army
HIT KIT
of Popular Songs

CD 2
6 Pages - PDF


Mines - Booby Traps
Identification Guide




CD 2
42 Pages - PDF


US
World War II
Posters



CD 2
250 Pages - PDF


German
World War II
Posters

CD 2
75 Pages - PDF


Troopships
of WorldWarII


CD 2
391 Pages - PDF


US Air Force
Combat Chronology
1941-45

CD 2
743 Pages - PDF


VE Day
Eisenhower Flyer


CD 2
1 Page - PDF
The files below are found on CD 3


Music

"Singing Soldiers"

Winners Second
All Army Soldier
Singing Contest

1954-55
19 Song LP Record
2 Album Set

CD 3
Info - PDF
Files - Folder


Music

What Do You
Do In The Infantry ?

American Military March
Semper Fidelis (Marines)




CD 3
Files - Folder


Radio

DDay
Radio Broadcasts
~
13 - BBC/CBS/NBC
Normandy Invasion
Broadcasts
~
24 - CBS Invasion
1 Hour Broadcasts


CD 3
Files - Folder


Cartoons

11
BANNED
World War II
Cartoons

Popeye
Superman
Donald Duck
Bugs Bunny
more ...

CD 3
Info - PDF


4th Infantry
Division

4th Infantry Division History

The 4th Infantry Division was reactivated on 1 June 1940 at Fort Benning, Georgia, under the command of MG Walter E. Prosser and arrived in the UK in early 1944.

Normandy Invasion

The division took part in the Normandy Invasion landings at Utah Beach, with the 8th Infantry Regiment of the 4th Division being the first surface-borne Allied unit to hit the beaches at Normandy on D-day, 6 June 1944.

Relieving the isolated 82d Airborne Division at Sainte-Mère-Église, the 4th cleared the Cotentin peninsula and took part in the capture of Cherbourg on 25 June. After taking part in the fighting near Periers, 6–12 July, the division broke through the left flank of the German Seventh Army, helped stem the German drive toward Avranches, and by the end of August had moved to Paris, and gave French forces the first place in the liberation of their capital.

During the liberation of Paris in WWII, Ernest Hemingway took on a self-appointed role as a civilian scout in the city of Paris for his friends in the 4th. He was with the 22nd Infantry Regiment when it moved from Paris, northeast through Belgium, and into Germany.

Belgium, Luxembourg, and Germany

The 4th then moved into Belgium through Houffalize to attack the Siegfried Line at Schnee Eifel on 14 September, and made several penetrations. Slow progress into Germany continued in October, and by 6 November the division entered the Battle of Hurtgen Forest, where it was engaged in heavy fighting until early December.

It then shifted to Luxembourg, only to meet the German winter Ardennes Offensive head-on (in the Battle of the Bulge) starting on 16 December 1944. Although its lines were dented, it managed to hold the Germans at Dickweiler and Osweiler, and, counterattacking in January across the Sauer, overran German positions in Fouhren and Vianden. Halted at the Prüm River in February by heavy enemy resistance, the division finally crossed on 28 February near Olzheim, and raced on across the Kyll on 7 March.

After a short rest, the 4th moved across the Rhine on 29 March at Worms, attacked and secured Würzburg and by 3 April had established a bridgehead across the Main at Ochsenfurt. Speeding southeast across Bavaria, the division had reached Miesbach on the Isar on 2 May 1945, when it was relieved and placed on occupation duty.



8th Infantry
"Fighting Eagles"
Regiment
8th Infantry Regiment History
1940
- 28 Jan-Stationed at Ft. Moultrie SC.
1941
- 18 Dec - Transferred to Camp Gordon, Ga.
1942
1943
- 1 Dec - Transferred to Ft. Jackson, Fl.
1944
-- 9 Jan - Staged at Camp Kilmer, NJ.
- 18 Jan - Departed New York P/E.
- 29 Jan - Arrived in England.
-- 6 Jun - Assaulted Normandy France.
-- 6 Sep - Crossed into Belgium.
- 11 Sep - Entered into Germany.
- 12 Dec - Crossed into Luxembourg.
1945
- 28 Jan - Returned to Belgium.
-- 7 Feb - Returned to Germany.
- 10 Jul - Returned to New York.
- 13 Jul - Moved to Camp Butler NC.
- 25 Feb - Inactivated.

The 8th Infantry Regiment was cited twice in the order of the day by the Belgian Army – the first for action in the Belgian Campaign, and later for action in the Ardennes. The Belgian Government subsequently awarded the regiment the Belgian Fourragère.

The Presidential Unit Citation was awarded to the regiment for action during on 6 June 1944 on the beaches of Normandy.



12th Infantry
"Red Warriors"
"Lethal Warriors"

Regiment
12th Infantry Regiment History
1940
- 3 Sep - Stationed at Ft. Howard, MD as part of the
---------- 8th and moved to Arlington Csantonment, VA.
1941
- 12 Jun - Transferred to Ft. Dix, NJ.
- 26 Jun - Attached to 1st Army.
- 24 0ct - Arrived at Ft. Benning, Ga.
- 21 Dec - Sent to Camp Gordon, Ga.
1942
1943
- 18 Apr - Returned to Ft. Dix. NJ.
- -1 Aug - Redesignated 12th Infantry Regiment.
- 25 Apr - Transferred to Camp Gordon Johnson, Fl.
- 30 Nov - Transferred to Ft. Jackson, SC.
1944
- 11 Jan - Staged at Camp Kilmer. NJ.
- 18 Jan - Departed New York.
- 29 Jan - Arrived in England.
-- 6 Jun - Assaulted Normandy.
-- 6 Sep - Crossed into Belgium.
- 11 Sep - Entered Germany.
- 12 Dec - Crossed into Luxembourg.
1945
- 28 Jan - Returned to Belgium
.
-- 7 Feb - Reentrererd Germany.
- 12 Jul - Returned to New York P/E.
- 15 Jul - Moved to Camp Butner, NC.
1946
- 27 Feb - Inactivated.

During World War II, the 12th Infantry spearheaded the Normandy Invasion on D-Day. Between 9 and 12 August 1944, the Regiment engaged and destroyed the famed SS Adolph Hitler Panzer Division, then went on to win a Presidential Unit Citation during the Battle of the Bulge. After the end of the Second World War, the unit was inactivated on 27 February 1946 at Camp Butner, North Carolina.

The Regiment was relieved on 10 October 1941 from assignment to the 8th Division and assigned to the 4th Division (later redesignated as the 4th Infantry Division. The 12th Infantry Regiment was reorganized as a motorized infantry regiment on 29 September 1942. Less than a year later, on 1 August 1943, the 12th was reorganized as a standard infantry regiment when the 4th Division was converted from motorized to dismounted infantry.

The regiment along with the rest of the 4th Infantry Division arrived in England on 29 January 1944. On D-Day, 6 June 1944, the 12th Infantry saw its first action of the war when, as part of the 4th Infantry Division, it spearheaded the assault landing on Utah Beach under the command of Colonel Russell "Red" Reeder. Between 9 and 12 August 1944, the regiment helped defeat the German (Operation Lüttich).

The regiment fought in five European campaigns through France, Belgium, Luxembourg and Germany. The 12th Infantry was awarded the Presidential Unit Citation for valor in action at Luxembourg during the Battle of the Bulge. The regiment was also awarded the Belgian Fourragere. After Germany's surrender, the 12th Infantry, along with the 4th Infantry Division, returned to the United States on 12 July 1945 and was inactivated 27 February 1946 at Camp Butner, North Carolina.



22nd Infantry
"Deeds, Not Words"
Regiment
22nd Infantry Regiment History
1941
- 21 Feb - Stationed at Ft. Benning, Ga.
- 27 Dec - Transferred to Camp Gordon, Ga.
1942
1943
- 16 Apr - Relocated to Ft. Dix, NJ.
- 28 Sep - Moved to Camp Gordon Johnston, Fla
-- 1 Dec - Moved to Ft. Jackson, SC.
1944
-- 8 Jan - Staged at Camp Kilmer, NJ.
- 18 Jan - Departed New York P/E.
- 29 Jan - Arrived England.
-- 6 Jun - Assaulted Normandy.
-- 6 Sep - Crossed into Belgium.
- 11 Sep - Entered Germany.
- 12 Dec - Crossed into Luxembourg.
1945
- 28 Jan - Returned to Belgium.
-- 7 Feb - Reentered Germany
- 12 Jul - Retrurned to New York.
- 13 Jul - Moved to Camp Butler, NC.
1946
-- 5 Mar - Inactivated.

The 22nd Infantry Regiment was stationed at Fort McClellan, Alabama, as a component of the 8th Infantry Brigade, which was the sole active component of the deactivated 4th Infantry Division. The regiment moved to Fort Benning on 21 February 1941 to train with the division, and then moved to Camp Gordon, Georgia on 27 December 1941, where it was reorganized under a motorized TO&E on 9 September 1942.

The regiment moved to Fort Dix, New Jersey on 16 April 1943, where it was reorganized under a regular infantry TO&E on 1 August 1943. The regiment continued to train for combat, moving on to Camp Gordon Johnston, Florida on 28 September 1943, and to Fort Jackson, South Carolina on 1 December 1943. 22nd IR subsequently got its Port Call orders, and staged at Camp Kilmer, New Jersey on 8 January 1944 until it shipped out from the New York Port of Embarkation on 18 January 1944.

The regiment arrived in England on 29 January 1944, settled in near Plymouth, England, and started preparations to assault Utah Beach.

The regiment assaulted Utah Beach on 6 June 1944, as part of VII Corps in the D-Day Invasion, and arrived in the vicinity of Pavenoville, France by the end of D-day. It then participated in the Cherbourg Peninsula operation while attached to 2nd Armored Division from 19 July through 2 August 1944.

The regiment then returned to 4th Infantry Division, and headed for Belgium as part of the Operation Cobra, moved into Belgium on 6 September 1944, and entered Germany on 11 September 1944.

The regiment was attached to 83d Infantry Division between 3–7 December 1944, and then returned to 4th Infantry Division in Luxembourg on 12 December 1944. 22nd IR then moved to Belgium on 28 January 1945, and re-entered Germany on 7 February 1945, where it remained on mop-up and occupation until 12 July 1945, when it DEROSed to the New York POE, and moved to its temporary home at Camp Butner, North Carolina while the regiment trained for movement to Japan. However, the war in the Pacific terminated, and the regiment remained at Camp Butner until it was deactivated on 5 March 1946.



4th Infantry
Division
Campaigns of World War II

Normandy
6 Jun - 24 Jul 44
Northern France
25 Jul - 14 Sep 44
Rhineland
15 Sep 44 - 21 Mar 45
Ardennes-Alsace
16 Dec 44 - 25 Jan 45
Central Europe
22 Mar - 11 May 45


Normandy
6 June - 24 July 1944

A great invasion force stood off the Normandy coast of France as dawn broke on 6 June 1944: 9 battleships, 23 cruisers, 104 destroyers, and 71 large landing craft of various descriptions as well as troop transports, mine sweepers, and merchantmen—in all, nearly 5,000 ships of every type, the largest armada ever assembled. The naval bombardment that began at 0550 that morning detonated large minefields along the shoreline and destroyed a number of the enemy’s defensive positions. To one correspondent, reporting from the deck of the cruiser HMS Hillary, it sounded like “the rhythmic beating of a gigantic drum” all along the coast. In the hours following the bombardment, more than 100,000 fighting men swept ashore to begin one of the epic assaults of history, a “mighty endeavor,” as President Franklin D. Roosevelt described it to the American people, “to preserve. . . our civilization and to set free a suffering humanity.”


Northern France
25 July - 14 September 1944

As July 1944 entered its final week, Allied forces in Normandy faced, at least on the surface, a most discouraging situation. In the east, near Caen, the British and Canadians were making little progress against fierce German resistance. In the west, American troops were bogged down in the Norman hedgerows. These massive, square walls of earth, five feet high and topped by hedges, had been used by local farmers over the centuries to divide their fields and protect their crops and cattle from strong ocean winds. The Germans had turned these embankments into fortresses, canalizing the American advance into narrow channels, which were easily covered by antitank weapons and machine guns. The stubborn defenders were also aided by some of the worst weather seen in Normandy since the turn of the century, as incessant downpours turned country lanes into rivers of mud. By 25 July, the size of the Allied beachhead had not even come close to the dimensions that pre–D-day planners had anticipated, and the slow progress revived fears in the Allied camp of a return to the static warfare of World War I. Few would have believed that, in the space of a month and a half, Allied armies would stand triumphant at the German border.



Rhineland
15 September 1944 - 21 March 1945

The Rhineland Campaign, although costly for the Allies, had clearly been ruinous for the Germans. The Germans suffered some 300,000 casualties and lost vast amounts of irreplaceable equipment. Hitler, having demanded the defense of all of the German homeland, enabled the Allies to destroy the Wehrmacht in the West between the Siegfried Line and the Rhine River. Now, the Third Reich lay virtually prostrate before Eisenhower’s massed armies.



Ardennes - Alsace Campaign
16 December 1944 - 25 January 1945

In August 1944, while his armies were being destroyed in Normandy, Hitler secretly put in motion actions to build a large reserve force, forbidding its use to bolster Germany’s beleaguered defenses. To provide the needed manpower, he trimmed existing military forces and conscripted youths, the unfit, and old men previously untouched for military service during World War II.

In September Hitler named the port of Antwerp, Belgium, as the objective. Selecting the Eifel region as a staging area, Hitler intended to mass twenty-five divisions for an attack through the thinly held Ardennes Forest area of southern Belgium and Luxembourg. Once the Meuse River was reached and crossed, these forces would swing northwest some 60 miles to envelop the port of Antwerp. The maneuver was designed to sever the already stretched Allied supply lines in the north and to encircle and destroy a third of the Allies’ ground forces. If successful, Hitler believed that the offensive could smash the Allied coalition, or at least greatly cripple its ground combat capabilities, leaving him free to focus on the Russians at his back door.



Central Europe Campaign
22 March - 11 May 1945
By the beginning of the Central Europe Campaign of World War II, Allied victory in Europe was inevitable. Having gambled his future ability to defend Germany on the Ardennes offensive and lost, Hitler had no real strength left to stop the powerful Allied armies. Yet Hitler forced the Allies to fight, often bitterly, for final victory. Even when the hopelessness of the German situation became obvious to his most loyal subordinates, Hitler refused to admit defeat. Only when Soviet artillery was falling around his Berlin headquarters bunker did the German Fuehrer begin to perceive the final outcome of his megalomaniacal crusade.


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