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88th
Infantry Division

313th Combat Engineers Battalion - 88th Infantry Division
313th
Combat
Engineers
Battalion
313th Medical Battalion - 88th Infantry Division
313th
Medical
Battalion
337th Field Artillery Battalion - 88th Infantry Division
337th
Field
Artillery
Battalion
338th Field Artillery Battalion - 88th Infantry Division
338th
Field
Artillery
Battalion
339th Field Artillery Battalion - 88th Infantry Division
339th
Field
Artillery
Battalion
913th Field Artillery Battalion - 88th Infantry Division
913th
Field
Artillery
Battalion
88th Infantry Division Band
88th
Infantry
Division
Band
88th Infantry Division Band
88th
Infantry
Division
Military Police Company
88th Infantry Division Band
88th
Infantry
Division
Quartermaster Company
88th Infantry Division Band
88th
Infantry
Division
Recon Troop (Mech)
88th Infantry Division Band
88th
Infantry
Division
Signal
Company
88th Infantry Division Band
788th
Ordnance
Company

Order of Battle

349th Infantry Regiment
350th Infantry Regiment
351st Infantry Regiment

337th Field Artillery Battalion (105mm)
338th Field Artillery Battalion (105mm)
339th Field Artillery Battalion (155mm)
913th Field Artillery Battalion (105mm)

88th Reconnaissance Troop (Mechanized)
88th Counter Intelligence Corps Detachment
88th Infantry Division Military Police Platoon
88th Infantry Division Special Troops
88th Quartermaster Company
88th Signal Company
313th Engineer Combat Battalion
313th Medical Battalion
788th Ordnance Light Maintenance Company

442nd Infantry Regiment (Nisei) attached Aug 44 - Sep 44


Casualties
Killed in Action:
2,298
Wounded in Action:
9,225
Died of Wounds:
258
Missing in Action:
521
Captured
379
Total Casualties
11,258



Days in Combat
344



Commanders

Maj. Gen. John E. Sloan
July 1942 – September 1944

Maj. Gen. Paul W. Kendall
September 1944 – July 1945

Brig. Gen. James C. Fry
July–November 1945

Maj. Gen. Bryant Moore
November 1945 to inactivation




Campaigns
Rome-Arno
22 Jan - 9 Sep 44
North Apennines 10 Sep 44 - 4 Apr 45
Po Valley

5 Apr - 8 May 45




Medals
Medal of Honor - 2
Distinguished Service Citation - 12
Distinguished Service Citation - 2
Silver Star - 522
Legion of Merit - 66
Soldier's Medal - 19
Bronze Star Medal - 3,784



Unit Citations
Third Battalion
351st Infantry Regiment

Laiatico
9 - 13 July 1944

Second Battalion
350th Infantry Regiment

Mt. Battaglia
27 Sept - 3 Oct 1944

Second Battalion
351st Infantry Regiment

Mt. Cappello
27 Sept - 1 Oct 1944





1942
 
15 Jul -
Activated at Camp Gruber, Oklahoma under the command of Major General John E. Sloan.
1943  
Mid Jun-
The 88th participated in Third Army Louisiana Maneuvers #3.
Late Aug-
The division moved to Fort Sam Houston, Texas.
Nov-
The division stages at Camp Patrick Henry, Virginia.
15 Dec-
The 88th arrivived at Casablanca, French Morocco from the Hampton Roads Port of Embarcation.
26 Dec-
An advance party of the 88th echelon departed for Italy.
28 Dec-
The Division moved to Magenta, Algeria and conducted intensive training for employment in Italy.
1944  
4 Jan-
The division went into the line as observers attached to 3rd, 34th, and 36th Infantry Divisions, and the British 5th, 46th, and 56th Divisions.
3 Jan-
A member of this advance echelon became the 88th’s first KIA when Sergeant William A. Streuli of Paterson, New Jersey (a forward observer in B/339th Field Artillery Battalion) was killed by fragments from a bomb dropped by a Luftwaffe aircraft in the 34th Infantry Division sector. Lieutenant Elwin Ricketts, Battery B Executive Officer, became the first WIA when he was wounded in the same attack.
6 Feb-
The main body of the 88th was transported to Italy in early February and concentrated around Piedimonte d'Alife for combat training.
27 Feb-
The first 88th Division unit into the line was 2nd Battalion, 351st Infantry, which relieved elements of the Texas Division’s 141st Infantry Regiment near Cervaro.
28 Feb-
The first artillery round fired in combat by an 88th DIVARTY unit was sent downrange by Battery C, 913th Field Artillery Battalion. It's target was a registration point at the Monte Cassino Abbey, the rubble of which was occupied by the Germans after the Allies bombed it.
4 Mar-
The entire Division moved into the line at 1000 hours.
5 Mar-
The division assumed responsibility for the sector previously occupied by the British 5th Division. At the same time, the 88th came under the control of the British X Corps, and deployed its three infantry regiments on line from the Mediterranean into the foothills to the east. Opposing the 88th in the strong fortified positions of the Gustav Line, were the German 71st and 94th Infantry Divisions. The Blue Devil infantry spent the next two months occupying and improving defensive positions and patrolling, while DIVARTY fired harassing and interdiction missions at German positions and suspected and known lines of communication.
11 May-
At 2300 the Allied front in Italy began their last attack on the Gustav Line with the the 88th. In less than an hour, the 350th Infantry Regiment captured Mt. Damiano, key terrain overlooking the flank of the French units attacking on the Division’s right.
12 May-
In that action, Staff Sergeant Charles W. Shea of F/350th took charge of his platoon after the platoon leader was killed and the platoon sergeant was wounded, and led an assault which knocked the defenders out of their well-prepared positions. For his actions that day, Staff Sergeant Shea became the first Blue Devil to earn the Medal of Honor.
11-14 May-
The rest of the Division also pushed hard and forced the stubborn foe off the Gustav Line. The 351st Infantry stormed into Santa Maria Infante and engaged in a particularly bitter battle with the German defenders there. After more than two days of vicious combat, the 351st seized Santa Maria.
11 May-
The 88th drove north to take Spigno, Mount Civita, Itri, Fondi, and Roccagorga. As the 349th Infantry Regiment passed through the 351st and continued the attack to the north, the 88th’s operations took on aspects of a pursuit. Through towns like Itri, Fondi, and Roccgorga, the Blue Devils drove on toward Rome, effectively destroying the German 94th Infantry Division in the process. So badly battered was the 94th that it had to be withdrawn to Germany for reconstitution, and did not return to combat until October.
29 May-
Elements of the 88th made contact with Allied units breaking out of the Anzio beachhead, reached Anzio on 29 May, and pursued the enemy into Rome.
4 Jun-
Elements of the 88th were the first to enter the Rome. After the fall of Rome, the 88th was pulled out of the line to refit and prepare for subsequent operations.
11 Jun-
After continuing across the Tiber to Bassanelio the 88th retired for rest and training.
5 Jul-
The Division went into defensive positions near Pomerance and relieved the 1st Armored Division in the vicinity.
8 Jul-
The Division attacked Volterra at 0500 with the 349th and 350th Infantry Regiments abreast, with the 351st in reserve. Intending to envelop the objective from both sides, the attack successfully drove the defenders of the veteran 90th Panzer Grenadier Division from their choice terrain. Volterra was secure by 2200 hours.
9 Jul-
While performing security duties on the Division’s left flank, the 351st Infantry Regiment unexpectedly ran into a hornet’s nest near Laiatico on 9 July. Here, the regiment encountered Grenadier Regiment 1060, an element of the recently-disbanded 92nd Infantry Division now attached to the 362nd Infantry Division, as well as other elements of the 90th Panzer Grenadiers.
12 Jul-
The 351st Regiment attacked again on the 12th with the 2nd and 3rd Battalions up and the 1st in reserve. The 3rd Battalion tore into the 1060th’s 1st Battalion, destroying it and killing the enemy battalion commander.
13 Jul-
All regimental objectives were secure; for its part in the attack, the 3rd Battalion, 351st Infantry Regiment was later awarded the Distinguished Unit Citation.
13 Jul-
Villamagna fell.
20 Jul-
The Arno River was crossed.
25 Jul-
By 25 July, the Fifth Army’s offensive power had been spent; the loss of VI Corps and its veteran 3rd, 36th, and 45th Infantry Divisions to the impending invasion of Southern France prevented it from continuing the drive further to the north. The removal of the French Expeditionary Corps for participation in the same operation also diminished Allied combat power in Italy. Above the Arno, the units of the Germans’ Army Group Southwest were finishing their preparations for defense of the Gothic Line, and the Allied forces of the US Fifth and British Eighth Armies were going to require every ounce of power they could muster to breach the heavily fortified line in the mountains that ran from the Ligurian coast in the east to the Adriatic in the west.
Aug-
Major General Sloan was transferred first to a hospital in Italy, then to the States for treatment of a recurring disease. General Sloan was succeeded by the Division’s Assistant Commander, Brigadier General Paul W. Kendall.
10 Sep-
Allied forces in Italy attacked toward the Gothic Line and penetrated it in the central and Adriatic sectors.
21 Sep-
After a period of rest and training, the Division opened its assault on the Gothic Line and advanced rapidly along the Firenzuola-Imola road, taking Mount Battaglianear near Casola Valsenio on the 28th.
27 Sep-
The 2nd Battalion - 351st Infantry Regiment earns the Distinguished Unit Citation for Monte Cappello. The fighting raged for days, sometimes literally at bayonet point,until the 1st and 2nd Battalions secured the top of the mountain.
27-28 Sep-
Captain Robert Roeder, CO of Company G, was awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions at Monte Battaglia.
27 Sep-
The 2nd Battalion - 350th Infantry Regiment earns the Distinguished Unit Citation for Monte Battaglia.
30 Sep-
The 349th Infantry Regiment attack the village of Belvedere enroute to its objective, Mt. Grande.
20-22 Oct-

The enemy counterattacked savagely and heavy fighting continued on the line toward the Po Valley. The strategic positions of Mount Grande and Farnetto were taken on 20 and 22 October.

24 Oct-
Company G, 351st came closest to breaking through, but was literally wiped out at Vedriano, southeast of Bologna, on 24 October.
26 Oct-

The 88th went over to the defensive in late October patrolling in the Mount Grande-Mount Cerrere sector and the Mount Fano improved positions, and rehabilitated its combat troops.

22 Nov-
The Division relieved the 85th Infantry Division in its sector.
1945  
13 Jan-
The Division was relieved for general rehabilitation.
24 Jan-

The division was committed in relief of the 91st Infantry Division near Loiano and Livergnano and after more patrolling and maintenance of defensive positions, the Division was pulled out of the line again for further rehabilitation and special training for the impending spring offensive to 2 Mar.

1 Apr-

That offensive, which would finally defeat the Wehrmacht in Italy, commenced with a supporting attack by the 92nd Infantry Division on the Ligurian coast in the west to draw German forces away from the point of the impending main effort.

9 Apr-
Another supporting attack, in much greater strength, was launched by the British Eighth Army on the Adriatic coast on 9 April. Finally, with the German reserves being decisively committed to meet these attacks at the extreme ends of the line in Italy, on 14 April, Fifth Army jumped off in the main attack against the German center.
15 Apr-

The 88th’s attack began at 2230 hours on 15 April, as its infantry regiments lunged toward Monterumici. In two days the Blue Devils knocked the German defenders off the key ridge.

17 Apr-
Monterumici fell on the 17th after an intense barrage.
24 Apr-

The Po River was crossed as the 88th pursued the enemy toward the Alps.

25 Apr-

Verona fell.

28 Apr-
Vicenza fell.
2 May-

The 88th was driving through the Dolomite Alps toward Innsbruck, Austria to link up with the 103rd Infantry Division, when the hostilities ended on 2 May 1945. German forces in Italy surrendered although it took until early the next day to notify all Blue Devil units of the capitulation.

4 May-
Elements of the 349th Infantry Regiment linked up with units from the 103rd Infantry Division’s 409th Infantry Regiment coming down from Austria where German forces had yet to surrender in the Brenner Pass.
7 Jun-

The 88th Division assumed POW Command duties to repatriate a minimum of 100,000 Germans and to form an estimated 120,000 of them into service units. POW strength figures at the time indicated that the 88th Division had approximately 295,000 Germans available to accomplish this dual mission. Later figures raised this total above 320,000 as Germans came in out of the hills, unguarded German service units were discovered and taken over, and responsibility for the Czech PWs was transferred from the Fifth Army to the Division.

1947 - 1954

The 88th in Occupation and the Free Territory of Trieste Trust Period.

TRUST stands for Trieste United States Troops, the 5,000 man U.S. contingent based in the Free Terrority of Trieste created in 1947. The Free State was established in 1947 in order to accomodate an ethnically and culturally mixed population in a neutral country between Italy and Yugoslavia.

After the war, the 88th Infantry Division on occupation duty in Italy guarded the Morgan Line from positions in Italy and Trieste until 15 September 1947. It was then withdrawn to Livorno and inactivated. The 351st Infantry was relieved from assignment to the division on 1 May 1947 and served as the main component of a garrison command in the Free Territory of Trieste, securing the disputed border between Italy and Yugoslavia.

The command served as the front line in the Cold War from 1947 to 1954, including confrontations with Yugoslavian forces. In October 1954 the territory was ceded to Italy and administration turned over to the Italian Army.

TRUST units, which included a number of 88th divisional support units, all bore a unit patch which was the coat of arms of the Free Territory of Trieste superimposed over the divisional quarterfoil, over which was a blue scroll containing the designation "TRUST" in white."




349th Infantry Regiment 88th Infantry Division Blue Devils
88th
Infantry Division
CD 1
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The files below are found on CD 1


We Were There
From Gruber To
Brenner Pass

History of the
88th Infantry Division


CD 1
98 Pages - PDF


History of the
338th Field Artillary

"Direct Support"
A Story of
Fightimg Men


CD 1
104 Pages - PDF


History of the
351st Infantry Regiment






CD 1
82 Pages - PDF


350th Infantry Regiment

Battle Mountain
Regiment

In Occupation
Trieste / Trust Book

CD 1
68 Pages - PDF


11 - 14 May 44

351st Infantry Regiment

Santa Maria Infante


CD 1
59 Pages - PDF


1944

349th Infantry Regiment

Monthly
Historical Narratives

CD 1
94 Pages - PDF


1944

350th Infantry Regiment

Monthly
Historical Narratives

CD 1
86 Pages - PDF


1944

351st Infantry Regiment

Monthly
Historical Narratives

CD 1
103 Pages - PDF


Mar 44

350th Infantry Regiment

Historical Notes



CD 1
10 Pages - PDF


21 - 25 May 44

350th Infantry Regiment
2nd Battalion

Operations at
Roccasecca

CD 1
27 Pages - PDF


Jul 44

350th Infantry Regiment

Operations Memo



CD 1
1 Page - PDF


Jun - Jul 44

351st Infantry Regiment

Battle of Laiatico



CD 1
20 Pages - PDF


Oct 44

88th Infantry Division
350th Infantry Regiment

S2-S3 Journal Maps
and Drawings

CD 1
5 Pages - PDF



27 Sep 44

351st Infantry Regiment
2nd Battalion

Monte Battaglia


CD 1
35 Pages - PDF



30 Sep - 2 Oct 44

349th Infantry Regiment
Company A

Operations at
Belvedere

CD 1
24 Pages - PDF


Oct 44

88th Infantry Division
350th Infantry Regiment

S2-S3 Journal


CD 1
18 Pages - PDF


Dec 44

350th Infantry Regiment

1st Battalion History


CD 1
9 Pages - PDF


Dec 44

350th Infantry Regiment

ChristmasMessage


CD 1
1 Pages - PDF



1945

349th Infantry Regiment

Monthly
Historical Narratives

CD 1
25 Pages - PDF



1945

350th Infantry Regiment

Monthly
Historical Narrative

CD 1
70 Pages - PDF


1945

351st Infantry Regiment

Historical Narratives



CD 1
45 Pages - PDF


1 - 2 Feb 45

350th Infantry Regiment
Company A

Operations at
Furcoli

CD 1
27 Pages - PDF


15 Apr - 2 May 45

88th Infantry Division

Operations
Po Valley Campaign


CD 1
23 Pages - PDF


15 - 21 Apr 45

349th Infantry Regiment

Operations in
the Capture of
Monterumici

CD 1
24 Pages - PDF


15 - 24 Apr 44

349th Infantry Regiment
2nd Battalion

Breakthrough and
Pursuit to Po River

CD 1
29 Pages - PDF


15 - 18 Apr 45

350th Infantry Regiment
Company H

Operations at
Monterumici

CD 1
31 Pages - PDF


17 Apr 45

350th Infantry Regiment
Company A

Operations at
Monterumici

CD 1
27 Pages - PDF


Maps

349th Infantry Regiment

Maps



CD 1
10 Pages - PDF


10 Sep 44 - 4 Apr 45

North Apennines
Campaign


CD 1
32 Pages - PDF


14 Apr - 2 May 44

The Final Campaign
Across Northwest
Italy

CD 1
145 Pages - PDF


Finito

The Po Valley
Campaign


CD 1
69 Pages - PDF


5 Apr - 8 May 45

Po Valley
Campaign


CD 1
28 Pages - PDF


Road To Rome



CD 1
66 Pages - PDF


22 Jan - 9 Sep 44

Rome - Arno

CD 1
31 Pages - PDF


19 Days
From Apennines
To the Alps

CD 1
90 Pages - PDF


Situation Maps

Europe

CD 1
83 Maps - PDF


9 Sep 43 - 21 Jan 44

Naples-Foggia



CD 1
32 Pages - PDF


War Against
Germany and Italy




CD 1
477 Pages - PDF


1914 - 1918

The
88th Infantry Division
in World War 1

CD 1
247 Pages - PDF


88th
Infantry Division
Blue Devils
Discussion Group

Meet Others
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The files below are found on CD 2


VE Day
Eisenhower Flyer



CD 2
1 Page - PDF


Rank
Insignia of Grade



CD 2
1 Page - PDF


Chart

Enlisted Men's
Uniform Insignias

CD 2
1 Page - PDF


Patch
Identification
Guide


CD 2
19 Pages - PDF


Mines - Booby Traps
Identification Guide

CD 2
80 Pages - PDF


Aircraft
Nose Art

CD 2
34 Pages - PDF


Aircraft
Recognition Guide

CD 2
17 Pages - PDF



Aircraft
Insignia Poster

CD 2
1 Page - PDF



US
World War II
Posters



CD 2
249 Pages - PDF



German
World War II
Posters



CD 2
75 Pages - PDF



Comic Book
Covers




CD 2
8 Pages - PDF


Song Lyrics

Army
HIT KIT
of Popular Songs

CD 2
6 Pages - PDF


Troopships
of World War II















CD 2
391 Pages - PDF


British
Grenadier Guards
1939 - 1945

Campaigns

BEF - 1939 - 1940
Tunisia 1942 - 1943
Italy - 1943 - 1945
Europe 1944 - 1945







CD 2
93 Pages - PDF


Film

The
BIG PICTURE
Documentary Film

"Combat Infantryman"

An Official
Television Report
to the Nation
From the
United States Army



CD 2
Film Info - PDF
Film: 27m14s - MP4


Newsreels

"Allied Vise Tightens
On Rhineland"
Universal Newsreel
7 Dec 44
Film: 7m17s

"Nazis Surrender"
Universal Newsreel
14 May 45
Film: 7m24s

"The Year 1945"
United Newsreel
Film: 8m34s

CD 2
Newsreels - Folder


1 Sep 39 - 10 May 42

Graphic History
Of The War





CD 2
76 Pages - PDF


1985

Veterans
Remerbrances
of World War II

40th Anniversary
of VE Day

CD 2
141 Pages - PDF


Brief History
of World War II







CD 2
55 Pages - PDF


APOs

Army
Postal Service
Addresses




CD 2
149 Pages - PDF
The files below are found on CD 3


Music

"Singing Soldiers"

Winners Second
All Army Soldier
Singing Contest

1954-55
19 Song LP Record
2 Album Set


CD 3
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Files - Folder


Music

What Do You
Do In The Infantry ?

American Military March
Semper Fidelis (Marines)





CD 3
Files - Folder


D-Day
Radio Broadcasts

13 - BBC/CBS/NBC
Normandy Invasion
Broadcasts

24 - CBS Invasion
1 Hour Broadcasts





CD 3
Files - Folder



Cartoons

11
BANNED
World War II
Cartoons

Bugs Bunny
Donald Duck
Popeye
Superman
more ...

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Files - Folder



Medal of Honor Recepient

Robert E. Roeder
Captain
Company G, 350th Infantry Regiment

Place and date: Mt. Battaglia, Italy, 27-28 Sep 44
Entered service at: Summit Station, Pennsylvania
Birth: Summit Station, Pennsylvania
G.O. No.: 31, 17 April 1945

Citation: For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at risk of life above and beyond the call of duty. Captain Roeder commanded his company in defense of the strategic Mount Battaglia. Shortly after the company had occupied the hill, the Germans launched the first of a series of determined counterattacks to regain this dominating height. Completely exposed to ceaseless enemy artillery-and small arms fire, Captain Roeder constantly circulated among his men, encouraging them and directing their defense against the persistent enemy. During the sixth counterattack, the enemy, by using flamethrowers and taking advantage of the fog, succeeded in overrunning the position. Captain Roeder led his men in a fierce battle at close quarters, to repulse the attack with heavy losses to the Germans. The following morning, while the company was engaged in repulsing an enemy counterattack in force, Captain Roeder was seriously wounded and rendered unconscious by shell fragments. He was carried to the company command post, where he regained consciousness. Refusing medical treatment, he insisted on rejoining his men. Although in a weakened condition, Captain Roeder dragged himself to the door of the command post and, picking up a rifle, braced himself in a sitting position. He began firing his weapon, shouted words of encouragement, and issued orders to his men. He personally killed two Germans before he himself was killed instantly by an exploding shell. Through Captain Roeder's able and intrepid leadership his men held Mount Battaglia against the aggressive and fanatical enemy attempts to retake this important and strategic height. His valorous performance is exemplary of the fighting spirit of the U.S. Army.



Medal of Honor Recepient

Charles W. Shea
Second Lieutenant
Company F, 350th Infantry Regiment

Place and Date: Near Mount Damiano, Italy, 12 May 44
Entered Service at:
New York, N.Y.
Birth: New York, NY.
G.O. No.: 4, 12 January 1945

Citation: For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at risk of life above and beyond the call of duty, on 12 May 1944, near Mount Damiano, Italy. As 2d Lt. Shea and his company were advancing toward a hill occupied by the enemy, 3 enemy machineguns suddenly opened fire, inflicting heavy casualties upon the company and halting its advance. 2d Lt. Shea immediately moved forward to eliminate these machinegun nests in order to enable his company to continue its attack. The deadly hail of machinegun fire at first pinned him down, but, boldly continuing his advance, 2d Lt. Shea crept up to the first nest. Throwing several hand grenades, he forced the 4 enemy soldiers manning this position to surrender, and disarming them, he sent them to the rear. He then crawled to the second machinegun position, and after a short fire fight forced 2 more German soldiers to surrender. At this time, the third machinegun fired at him, and while deadly small arms fire pitted the earth around him, 2d Lt. Shea crawled toward the nest. Suddenly he stood up and rushed the emplacement and with well-directed fire from his rifle, he killed all 3 of the enemy machine gunners. 2d Lt. Shea's display of personal valor was an inspiration to the officers and men of his company.



Distinguished Unit Citation

3rd Battalion
351st Infantry Regiment


9 - 13 July 1944
Vicinity of Laiatico, Italy

The 3rd Battalion, 351st Infantry Regiment, is cited for outstanding performance of duty in action during the period 9 to 13 Jnly 1944 in the vicinity of Laiatico, Italy. During the attack on strongly fortified German positions in the vicinity of Laiatico, the 3rd Battalion occupied an advanced position devoid of cover and with both flanks exposed, and for three days withstood heavy enemy artillery and mortar bombardments as well as three vicious enemy counterattacks supported by tanks. Displaying courage, skill, and determined fighting spirit, the battalion frustrated all enemy efforts to defend the town and surrounding strategic positions. On the fourth day, the battalion launched a night attack and penetrated the German stronghold from the flanks and rear. Aggressively exploiting its breakthrough, the battalion seized a German regimental command post after a savage hand-to-hand struggle in the darkness and cut the main escape route from the Laiatico hill mass. As a result of the 3rd Battalion's prodigious efforts, 425 prisoners were taken, 250 Germans were killed or wounded, and a large quantity of enemy weapons were captured which were promptly employed with telling effect against the battered German forces. The timely capture of this key enemy defensive position compelled the Germans to abandon a carefully prepared, strongly defended line and opened the route of advance to the Arno River. The fearlessness, heroic determinations and aggressive lighting spirit of the officers and men of the 3rd Battalion, 351st Infantry Regiment, resulted in a performance which brings honor to the armed forces of the United States.


Distinguished Unit Citation

2nd Battalion
350th Infantry Regiment

27 September - 3 October 1944
Mt. Battaglia, Italy

The 2nd Battalion, 350th Infantry Regiment is cited for outstanding performance of duty in action during the period 27 September to 3 October 1944 at Mt. Battaglia, Italy. The 2nd Battalion was assigned the mission of seizing and holding strategic Mt. Battaglia. For seven days, in the face of incessant and violent counterattacks by powerful enemy forces, which at times included elements of four divisions, this battalion clung tenaciously to its positions on the objective. Each attack was preceded by artillery and mortar barrages and climaxed by bitter fire fights, use of flamethrowers by the enemy, hand-to-hand combat, bayonet charges, and grenade duels. The gallant officers and men of this battalion repulsed each attack with a marked display of fighting ability and teamwork. Evacuation of the wounded was extremely difficult because of the inclement weather conditions, the nature of the terrain, and the fact that the enemy artillery firing from the front and both flanks, covered every route of approach to Mt. Battaglia with a hail of fire. Nevertheless, all casualties were promptly evacuated by teams of litter bearers who courageously transported the wounded for long distances through artillery barrages to a point in the rear where further evacuation could be carried on by ambulances. All supplies were brought to the battalion's positions by pack mules supplemented by carrying parties. On several occasions the ammunition supply became dangerously low, and when the men exhausted their hand grenades, they resorted to throwing rocks at the oncoming enemy. Though fighting under the most adverse battle conditions, the officers and men of this battalion displayed an indomitable spirit that refused to waver under the fiercest enemy attacks. The outstanding fighting ability and magnificent courage displayed by the 2nd Battalion, 350th Infantry Regiment are exemplary of the finest traditions of the Army of the United States.


Distinguished Unit Citation

2nd Battalion

351st Infantry Regiment


27 September - 1 October 1944
Mt.Capello, Italy

The 2nd Battalion, 351st Infantry Regiment is cited for outstanding performance of duty in action during the period The battalion was assigned the mission of wresting the strategically important Mt.Capello from a determined and numerically superior German force. In the face of a withering hail of fire from all types of weapons, the 2nd Battalion launched its attack down the barren, forward slopes of Mt.Guasteto, Italy, eliminating a strong reverse slope German position in four violent assaults characterized by bitter fire fights and vicious hand-to-hand grenade duels. Although outnumbered, the soldiers of this organization maintained their captured position, despite ruthless enemy counterattacks preceded by intense artillery and mortar barrages. Although suffering from severe losses and confronted by fanatical enemy resistance, the courageous officers and men of the 2nd Battalion again resumed a full scale offensive and, advancing by infiltration, neutralizing resistance by furious hand-to-hand fighting within the German positions, gained a foothold on the barren slopes of Mt. Capello. Setting a commendable example of coolness and efficiency in the face of great danger, the 2nd Battalion fought grimly, tenaciously maintaining its foothold, despite the murderous enemy fire and wave after wave of fresh enemy assault troops. In a notable display of combat skill, teamwork, and determination, the men of the 2nd Battalion, because of a shortage of ammunition, resorted to using captured German machine guns and grenades to meet the enemy onslaughts. Utilizing personnel from battalion headquarters as riflemen, because of its heavily depleted effective strength, the battalion, in a final all-out assault, drove the enemy from Mt. Capello, retaining this strategic terrain feature, despite final desperate enemy counterattacks. The timely capture of this key enemy position frustrated violent enemy efforts to hold terrain of vital importance. A dangerous enemy penetration between the 351st Infantry Regiment and another hard-pressed infantry regiment on the right was averted by the heroic determination, self-sacrifice, and unfailing devotion to duty of the officers and men of the 2nd Battalion, 351st Infantry Regiment. The valorous performance of the 2nd Battalion, 351st Infantry Regiment, reflects great credit on the personnel of the regiment and upon the armed forces of the United States.



88th Infantry
"Blue Devils"
Division
88th Infantry Division History

The 88th Infantry Division was one of the first all draftee divisions to enter the war. Formed at Camp Gruber, Oklahoma, the division arrived at Casablanca, French Morocco, 15 December 1943, and moved to Magenta, Algeria, on the 28th for intensive training. It arrived at Naples, Italy, 6 February 1944, and concentrated around Piedimonte d'Alife for combat training. An advance element went into the line before Cassino, 27 February, and the entire unit relieved British elements along the Garigliano River in the Minturno area, 5 March. A period of defensive patrols and training followed.

On 11 May, the 88th drove north to take Spigno, Mount Civita, Itri, Fondi, and Roccagorga, reached Anzio, 29 May, and pursued the enemy into Rome, being the first American unit into the city on 4 June, after a stiff engagement on the outskirts of the city. An element of the 88th is credited with being first to enter the Eternal City. After continuing across the Tiber to Bassanelio the 88th retired for rest and training, 11 June. The Division went into defensive positions near Pomerance, 5 July, and launched an attack toward Volterra on the 8th, taking the town the next day. Laiatico fell on the 11th, Villamagna on the 13th, and the Arno River was crossed on the 20th although the enemy resisted bitterly.

After a period of rest and training, the Division opened its assault on the Gothic Line, 21 September 1944, and advanced rapidly along the Firenzuola-Imola road, taking Mount Battaglia (Casola Valsenio, RA) on the 28th. The enemy counterattacked savagely and heavy fighting continued on the line toward the Po Valley. The strategic positions of Mount Grande and Farnetto were taken, 20 and 22 October. From 26 October 1944 to 12 January 1945, the 88th entered a period of defensive patrolling in the Mount Grande-Mount Cerrere sector and the Mount Fano area.

From 24 January to 2 March 1945, the Division defended the Loiano-Livergnano area and after a brief rest returned to the front. The drive to the Po Valley began on 15 April. Monterumici fell on the 17th after an intense barrage and the Po River was crossed, 24 April, as the 88th pursued the enemy toward the Alps. The cities of Verona and Vicenza were captured on the 25th and 28th and the Brenta River was crossed, 30 April. The 88th was driving through the Dolomite Alps toward Innsbruck, Austria where it linked up with the 103rd Infantry Division, when the hostilities ended on 2 May 1945.

The unit was in combat for 344 days and sustained 15,173 casualties (killed, wounded or missing).



349th Infantry
"Kraut Killers"
Regiment
349th Infantry Regiment History

Constituted in the National Army 5 August 1917 as the 349th Infantry Regiment, assigned to the 88th Division. Organized 30 August 1917 at Camp Dodge, Iowa. Demobilized 12 June 1919 at Camp Dodge. (88th Division demobilized 10 June 1919, relieving components from assignment; reorganized in 1921 in the Organized Reserves.) Reconstituted, allotted to the Organized Reserves, assigned to the 88th Division, VII Corps Area, 24 June 1921, and organized in October 1921.

Ordered into active military service, less personnel, and organized 15 July 1942 at Camp Gruber, Oklahoma, as an element of the 88th Infantry Division. Inactivated 22 September-7 October 1947 in the vicinity of Livorno, Italy. Organized Reserves redesignated Organized Reserve Corps in March 1948; redesignated Army Reserve in 1952.



350th Infantry
"Battle Mountain"
Regiment
350th Infantry Regiment History

Constituted in the National Army 5 August 1917 as the 350th Infantry Regiment, assigned to the 88th Division. Organized 27 August 1917 at Camp Dodge, Iowa. Demobilized 5-8 June 1919 at Camp Dodge. (88th Division demobilized 10 June 1919, relieving components from assignment; reorganized in 1921 in the Organized Reserves.) Reconstituted, allotted to the Organized Reserves, assigned to the 88th Division, VII Corps Area, 24 June 1921, and organized in October 1921.

Ordered into active military service, less personnel, and organized 15 July 1942 at Camp Gruber, Oklahoma, as an element of the 88th Infantry Division. Inactivated 23 September-16 October 1947 at Livorno, Italy. Relieved from assignment to the 88th Infantry Division on 28 May 1948. Activated 15 June 1948 in Austria. Withdrawn from allotment to the Reserves and allotted to the Regular Army 1 December 1951.



351st Infantry
"Spearhead"
Regiment
351st Infantry Regiment History

Constituted in the National Army 5 August 1917 as the 351st Infantry Regiment, assigned to the 88th Division. Organized 30 August 1917 at Camp Dodge, Iowa. Demobilized 7 June 1919 at Camp Dodge. (88th Division demobilized 10 June 1919, relieving components from assignment; reorganized in 1921 in the Organized Reserves.) Reconstituted, allotted to the Organized Reserves, assigned to the 88th Division, VII Corps Area, 24 June 1921, and organized in October 1921.

Ordered into active military service, less personnel, and organized 15 July 1942 at Camp Gruber, Oklahoma, as an element of the 88th Infantry Division. Relieved of assignment to the 88th Infantry Division 1 May 1947. Withdrawn from the Reserves and allotted to the Regular Army in 1951.



88th Infantry
Division

Campaigns

88th Infantry Division
Campaigns of World War II

Rome-Arno
22 Jan - 9 Sep 44
North Apennines 10 Sep 44 - 4 Apr 45
Po Valley

5 Apr - 8 May 45




Rome-Arno Campaign
22 January – 9 September 1944

The Allied operations in Italy between January and September 1944 were essentially an infantryman’s war where the outcome was decided by countless bitterly fought small unit actions waged over some of Europe’s most difficult terrain under some of the worst weather conditions found anywhere during World War II.


North Apennines Campaign
10 September 1944 – 4 April 1945

The northern Apennines fighting was the penultimate campaign in the Italian theater. Although the Allies steadily lost divisions, materiel, and shipping to operations elsewhere, which diminished their capabilities, their offensives prevented the Axis from substantially reinforcing other fronts with troops from Italy. Yet the transfer of units from Fifth and Eighth Armies for use in northwest Europe, southern France, and Greece, both after the capture of Rome and during the North Apennines Campaign itself, left Allied commanders with just enough troops to hold Axis forces in Italy but without sufficient forces to destroy the enemy or to end the campaign.


Po Valley Campaign
5 April – 8 May 1945

For the Allied armies in Italy, the Po Valley offensive climaxed the long and bloody Italian campaign. When the spring offensive opened, it initially appeared that its course might continue the pattern of the previous months and battles in Italy, becoming another slow, arduous advance over rugged terrain, in poor weather, against a determined, well-entrenched, and skillful enemy.

However, by April 1945 the superbly led and combat-hardened Allied 15th Army Group, a truly multinational force, enjoyed an overwhelming numerical superiority on the ground and in the air. On the other side, Axis forces had been worn down by years of combat on many fronts; they were plagued by poor political leadership at the top as well as shortages of nearly everything needed to wage a successful defensive war.

By April 1945 factors such as terrain, weather, combat experience, and able military leadership, that had for months allowed the Axis to trade space for time in Italy could no longer compensate for the simple lack of manpower, air support, and materiel. By the end of the first two weeks of the campaign both sides realized that the end of the war in Italy was in sight, and that all the Allies needed to complete the destruction of Axis forces was the skillful application of overwhelming pressure, a feat largely accomplished within ten days, by 2 May 1945.



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